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Reisterstown in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Buffalo Soldiers”

 
 
"Buffalo Soldiers" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 12, 2007
1. "Buffalo Soldiers" Marker
Inscription. First Sgt. Augustus Walley, a Reisterstown native, awarded The Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery at Cuchillo Negro Mountain, New Mexico.

Dedicated on the 100th anniversary of The Spanish-American War July 13, 1998.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Buffalo Soldiers, and the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.855′ N, 76° 49.757′ W. Marker is in Reisterstown, Maryland, in Baltimore County. Marker is at the intersection of Cockey’s Mill Road and Reisterstown Road (Maryland Route 140), on the left when traveling east on Cockey’s Mill Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Reisterstown MD 21136, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John and Margaret Reister (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Oldest High School in Baltimore County (about 400 feet away); Colonel William Norris (about 500 feet away); Glyndon Station (approx. 0.9 miles away); Hannah More Academy (approx. 1.1 miles away); Glyndon (approx. 1.1 miles away); Original Cornerstone of the Franklin Senior High School (approx. 1.2 miles away); Original Bell of the Franklin Academy (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Reisterstown.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
“Buffalo Soldiers” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, May 12, 2013
2. “Buffalo Soldiers” Marker
This is a new sign without the quotes around Buffalo Soldiers

1. Photo of Augustus Walley at Findagrave.com. (Submitted on April 16, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Augustus Walley. Short biography of Augustus Walley. (Submitted on February 23, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Augustus Walley
1st Sgt. Augustus Walley was one of three Maryland-born, Afro-American cavalrymen who received the Medal of Honor on the western frontier, the others being Sgt. Thomas Boyne and Cpl. William O. Wilson. The following profile is extracted from "The Buffalo Soldier Story: The Proud History of the 9th and 10th Cavalry - Maryland Military Heroes" which is found at <http://members.aol.com/baltbufsol/heroes.html>

Augustus Walley was born into slavery on March 10, 1856, in Reisterstown, Maryland. Freed after the Civil War, he worked as a laborer in the Reisterstown area until 1878. On November 26, 1878, he enlisted in Baltimore and was assigned to the 9th Regiment, U.S. Cavalry, as a private with Troop I. He was shipped to the western frontier, serving continuously until his retirement in 1907, with 29 years of service.

Events leading to the application for a Medal of Honor (for his bravery on August 16, 1881, in action against hostile Apaches at Cuchillo Negro Mountain, New Mexico) were cited by Lieut. George R. Burnett, 9th
“Buffalo Soldiers” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 19, 2008
3. “Buffalo Soldiers” Marker
Augustus Walley is buried in St Luke United Methodist Church Cemetery. The GPS Coordinates for his grave are N39.4621 W76.8195
U.S. Cavalry, as follows: "During the fight a horse of a Private Burton became unmanageable and carried [Burton] directly into Indian fire. To avoid this, Burton dropped from his saddle, injured and inactive. Assumed dead, the command was given to fall back and take another position, but Burton called out for help and to be rescued. [Walley] without regard for his own safety under heavy enemy fire went to Private Burton's assistance and brought him to safety.'

Lt. Burnett also cited numerous other instances of Private Walley's gallantry during the two years under his command, and the medal recommendation was approved by the Regimental Commander, Colonel Edward Hatch who also recommended that the soldier be awarded a Certificate of Merit for distinguished service - considered an even higher tribute at that time.

The Medal of Honor was awarded to Pvt. Augustus Walley on October 1, 1890, with a Certificate of Merit.

During the Spanish-American War, then Sergeant Walley was sent to Cuba with the 10th U.S. Cavalry and was awarded another Certificate of Merit for gallantry under fire. He subsequently spent two years in the Philippines Islands during the Philippine-American War (a.k.a. the Philippine "Insurrection") with the 10th Cavalry and ultimately retired from the "Buffalo Soldiers" in 1907.

Walley took up residence in Butte, Montana before being recalled to active duty during the First World War on May 1, 1918. He was assigned as First Sergeant,
“Buffalo Soldiers” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 19, 2008
4. “Buffalo Soldiers” Marker
Augustus Walley's original grave marker.
Sanitary Corps at Camp Beauregard, Louisiana until March 8, 1919. Retired again, he lived on Etting Avenue in Baltimore City until his death on April 9, 1938. He is buried in the cemetery of St. Luke's United Methodist Church in Reisterstown, Maryland.
    — Submitted April 16, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.

 
Categories. African AmericansHeroesMilitaryNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, Spanish-AmericanWars, US Indian
 
“Buffalo Soldiers” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 19, 2008
5. “Buffalo Soldiers” Marker
Augustus Walley street sign at entrance to the church cemetery
Buffalo Soldier Memorial, Leavenworth, Kansas. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, 1993
6. Buffalo Soldier Memorial, Leavenworth, Kansas.
Despite a record of courage, valor, patriotism and bravery, African Americans have never been fully recognized or acknowledged for their honorable and selfless military service. Buffalo Soldier Memorials, like this marker and the memorial in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, are only recent efforts to do so.
"Lest We Forget, 1st Sgt. Augustus Walley" image. Click for full size.
May 29, 1995
7. "Lest We Forget, 1st Sgt. Augustus Walley"
Program from the 1995 Memorial Day services celebrating Walley's life and the dedication of a new, Medal of Honor headstone at his gravesite in St. Lukes Cemetery, 58 Bond Avenue, three blocks southeast of this marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 13, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 4,202 times since then and 77 times this year. Last updated on April 18, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on August 13, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 13, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   6. submitted on April 16, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7. submitted on June 18, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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