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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses

 
 
Madison Square, Southern Line of Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 2008
1. Madison Square, Southern Line of Defenses Marker
Inscription. Through this square ran the southern line of defenses of the British who held Savannah from December 29, 1778 to July 11, 1782. After a siege of 22 days, at dawn of October 9, 1779, the strong western defenses on the line of the present West Broad Street, were assaulted by 3,500 French troops under
Charles Hector, Count D'Estaing,
who had come to Savannah flushed with his recent victories at St. Vincent and Grenada, and 1,500 Georgia, South Carolina and Continental troops under
Major General Benjamin Lincoln.
Brigadier General Lachlan McIntosh commanded one attacking American column and Col. John Laurens, of South Carolina, another. After three charges of unsurpassed bravery, in which Count D'Estaing was twice wounded, a retreat was sounded. In leading a charge of his American Legion, Brigadier General (Count) Casimir Pulaski was mortally wounded. Among the American dead were Major John Jones of Liberty County, GA. and Sergeant William Jasper. "This Heroic Action has given to the history of Savannah and the State of Georgia a chapter than which none is bloodier, braver or more noteworthy."

Erected by the City of Savannah and patriotic societies on October 9, 1929 the 150th Anniversary of the Assault. As a tribute to the valor and sacrifices of the allied French and American
Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 2008
2. Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses Marker
forces.
 
Erected 1929 by City of Savannah.
 
Location. 32° 4.424′ N, 81° 5.642′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker can be reached from Bull Street near West Harris Street. Touch for map. Marker located in Madison Square. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Madison Square (a few steps from this marker); History Of Emancipation: Special Field Orders No. 15 (a few steps from this marker); The March to the Sea (a few steps from this marker); Sergeant Jasper (within shouting distance of this marker); Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemansonry (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Sorrel–Weed House (within shouting distance of this marker); Sherman's Headquarters (within shouting distance of this marker); Ogeechee Road (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Regarding Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses. West Broad Street is now known as Martin Luther King Blvd., in Savannah.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses Marker
Madison Square Historical Marker on the right
To better understand the relationship, see each marker shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Siege and Battle of Savannah. from Our Georgia History (Submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Charles Hector. French admiral, commander of the first French fleet sent in support of the American colonists during the American Revolution. (Submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. Benjamin Lincoln. Lincoln participated in the attack on Savannah, Georgia on October 9, 1779 and was forced to retreat to Charleston, South Carolina (Submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. Casimir Pulaski. Pulaski was a noted cavalryman and played a large role in training Revolutionary troops, with Congress naming him "Commander of the Horse". (Submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

5. William Jasper ,Wikipedia entry. He was a sergeant in the 2nd South Carolina Regiment. (Submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. Madison Square, British Southern Line of Defenses Marker
Count D'Estaing image. Click for full size.
5. Count D'Estaing
General Benjamin Lincoln image. Click for full size.
By Charles Wilson Peale.
6. General Benjamin Lincoln
General C. Pulaski, image. Click for full size.
7. General C. Pulaski,
With the authorization of Congress he formed the Independent Corps (later to be known as the Pulaski Legion.)
Sgt. Jasper Monument at Center of Madison Square image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 2008
8. Sgt. Jasper Monument at Center of Madison Square
Select the link in the "Related Markers" section for more information on this monument.
Spring Hill Redoubt, west end of the line saw Sgt Jasper's Heroic action image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 2008
9. Spring Hill Redoubt, west end of the line saw Sgt Jasper's Heroic action
He recovered the flag, and was mortally wounded
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,608 times since then and 53 times this year. Last updated on February 25, 2014, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1. submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on August 25, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on July 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on March 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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