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Laurel in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Laurel: A Factory Town Bridging Two Counties

Riverfront Park Heritage & Nature

 
 
Laurel: A Factory Town Bridging Two Counties Marker image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, February 2, 2014
1. Laurel: A Factory Town Bridging Two Counties Marker
Inscription. Montpelier's Nicholas Snowden established an early Snowden family grist mill by 1811 at the fall line of the Patuxent River. A cotton mill was built and leased to a Mr. Johnson in 1824, and the site also may have included a saw mill.

After 1835 with the arrival of the railroad, Laurel was primed for growth. The Patuxent Company, chartered in 1836, significantly expanded the mills. Laurel's early mill owners were related. The Pautxent Company's original owners included Nicholas Snowden's son-in-law Horace Capron, Theodore Jenkins (who owned Montpelier Mansion) A.E. Hall, W.C. Shaw, Snowden's widow Elizabeth, and O.C. Tiffany, Capron's cousin. The Tiffany manufacturing family stayed involved into the 1870s.

Many mill workers likely came from outlying farms, and lived nearby across the river.

The bridge that connected Laurel and Howard County was the primary crossing between the two for more than 100 years. Known as the 9th Street Bridge it washed away in 1899, and was rebuilt. By the time Hurricane Agnes washed out the bridge again in 1972, the larger C. Phillip Nicholas bridge further downstream at Rt. 216 and 7th Street had become the main crossing, and the bridge was not rebuilt.
 
Erected by City of Laurel.
 
Location.
Theodore Jenkins and Patuxent Manufacturing Company Charter image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, February 2, 2014
2. Theodore Jenkins and Patuxent Manufacturing Company Charter
39° 6.627′ N, 76° 51.433′ W. Marker is in Laurel, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on 9th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at the North end of 9th street, just south of the Patuxent River. Marker is in this post office area: Laurel MD 20707, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Casula Point (here, next to this marker); Laurel Factory: A Mill Town (within shouting distance of this marker); Laurel Harnessed the River to Power the Cotton Mill (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Laurel Cotton Mill and Dam (about 300 feet away); Laurel Factory: (about 300 feet away); Water From the Dam Powered the Cotton Mill (about 600 feet away); Methodism in Laurel (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Old Stone Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Laurel.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of Laurel (Laurel Historical Society's website). (Submitted on March 3, 2014, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland.)
2. History of Laurel (City of Laurel's website). (Submitted on March 3, 2014, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Patuxent River Bridge at 9th and Main Streets image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, February 2, 2014
3. Patuxent River Bridge at 9th and Main Streets
Laurel: A Factory Town Bridging Two Counties Marker image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, January 20, 2014
4. Laurel: A Factory Town Bridging Two Counties Marker
Laurel Mill Complex image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 15, 2014
5. Laurel Mill Complex
A panoramic view of the Laurel Mill complex circa 1905 suggests how big it was. The 9th Street Bridge is clearly visible. The Laurel Museum can be seen up the hill to the left of the main factory building and the Laurel dam is the right rear.
Close-up of photo on marker
Theodore Jenkins image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 15, 2014
6. Theodore Jenkins
Close-up of photo on marker
Patuxent Manufacturing Company Charter image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 15, 2014
7. Patuxent Manufacturing Company Charter

1835 — Laws of Maryland — Chapter 26
An Act to Incorporate the Patuxent Company
Passed Jan. 28, 1836

SECTION I. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Maryland, That Horace Capron, Theodore Jenkins, A. E. Hall, E. Snowden, O. C. Tiffany, W. C. Shaw, their associates, successors and assigns, are hereby made, constituted and declared to be a body corporate and politic, by the name and style of the Patuxent Company, and as such by that name, may have perpetual succession, and may sue and be sued, implead and be impleaded, answer and be answered, in any court of law or equity; and shall be able and capable to make and use a common seal, and the same to change and alter at pleasure; also to have and use, exercise and enjoy, as a corporate body, all the powers, rights and privileges proper and necessary for the purpose of manufacturing cotton, iron and other articles, and of vending the same; and for the aforesaid purposes, to purchase, hold and use estate, real, personal and mixed, and to construct such buildings and improvements on their land as may be deemed necessary, and the said estate, or any part thereof, to sell and convey, or other-wise dispose of, and generally to do all such acts, and to ordain, establish and enforce all such by-laws and regulations as shall he necessary and proper for conducting the business of said corporation, the same not being contrary to law or the provisions of this act.
Close-up of photo on marker
1905 – Patuxent River Bridge at 9th and Main Streets image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 15, 2014
8. 1905 – Patuxent River Bridge at 9th and Main Streets
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 3, 2014, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland. This page has been viewed 368 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 3, 2014, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 20, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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