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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Darien in McIntosh County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Darien Waterfront

 
 
Darien Waterfront Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 2008
1. Darien Waterfront Marker
Inscription.
Throughout the 19th century sailing ships docked at wharves along this waterfront on either side of the present bridge to load with plantation goods. Primarily rice and Sea Island cotton, lumber and naval stores. This activity made Darien one of the leading seaports on the southern coast. Port activity was interrupted for several years when the waterfront was burned during the destruction of Darien by Union forces in 1863.
 
Location. 31° 22.066′ N, 81° 26.124′ W. Marker is in Darien, Georgia, in McIntosh County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Ocean Highway (U.S. 17) and Fort King George Drive (Georgia Route 25). Touch for map. On the waterfront, north bank of the Altamaha River. Marker is in this post office area: Darien GA 31305, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Port of Darien (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Darien (within shouting distance of this marker); Darien (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort King George (within shouting distance of this marker); The Burning of Darien (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line);
Tabby Ruins Marker near Darien Waterfront Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Tabby Ruins Marker near Darien Waterfront Marker
"Remains of warehouses shops and taverns which served as the timber and shipping industries of Darien"
Methodists at Darien (about 700 feet away); Vernon Square (approx. 0.2 miles away); McIntosh County (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Darien.
 
Regarding Darien Waterfront. Tabby is a building material consisting of lime, sand, water, and crushed oyster shells. It was made and used on the Sea Islands of coastal South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida in the Southern United States during the Colonial period up until the early 1800s as a substitute for bricks, which were rare and expensive because of the absence of local clay. The name comes from the Spanish word, tapia, which means "mud wall".
 
Also see . . .  Longstreet Highroad Guide to the Georgia Coast & Okefenokee. Darien: Once a great seaport on the Atlantic coast, exporting cotton, rice, and timber in several boom and bust cycles, Darien today depends on commercial fishing and tourism. A commercial waterfront, with nineteenth century churches, Victorian homes, tabby ruins, and Fort King George State Historic Site. (Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable PlacesWar, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Darien Waterfront "Tabby" ruins image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Darien Waterfront "Tabby" ruins
Darien Waterfront ruins image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. Darien Waterfront ruins
Darien Waterfront Tabby ruins image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
5. Darien Waterfront Tabby ruins
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 940 times since then and 35 times this year. Last updated on March 3, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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