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Parkers Crossroads in Henderson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Freeman's Battery

Forrest's Artillery

 
 
Freeman's Battery Monument (Front) image. Click for full size.
By David Graff, April 24, 2012
1. Freeman's Battery Monument (Front)
Inscription.
Front

Dedicated to
Freeman's Battery
Forrest's Artillery
and
Samuel L. Freeman.
General Nathan Bedford
Forrest's First Artillery
Captain Freeman's Battery
fought near here
during the Battle of
Parker's Crossroads
Dec. 31, 1862


Rear

General N.B. Forrest opened the battle of Parker's Crossroads by placing a 12 pounder bronze field howitzer under the command of Sergeant Nat Baxter on a knoll in Hicks field four hundred yards from the enemy. The Federals were supported by three cannon. The Union assault was so intense Baxter's men were forced to load and fire lying down. In spite of the awkward position, the firing was rapid. Baxter's gun dismounted one of the Federal guns to the great satisfaction of General Forrest, who remained with Baxter's gun during the duel and was with the piece frequently throughout the day. The other two guns were later captured. Forrest relied chiefly on his artillery in fighting the Federals at the crossroads and did not expose his soldiers unless necessary for the protection of the guns.

The Federals were driven beyond the crossroads and were surrendering when Forrest was surprised by another Union force behind his artillery. Exposed to fire front and rear, he withdrew in good order leaving
Freeman's Battery Monument (Rear) image. Click for full size.
By David Graff, April 24, 2012
2. Freeman's Battery Monument (Rear)
the three captured guns and one Confederate gun that had exploded. Two additional guns of Freeman's Battery were left when the new Federal force killed all the artillery horses.

In his report of the battle General Forrest stated that Captain Freeman and all of his men deserved special mention, keeping up as they did a constant fire from their pieces not withstanding the enemy made every effort at silencing their guns.

Erected June 8, 2002 by Freeman's Battery Forrest's Artillery, Camp 1939. Sons of Confederate Veterans
 
Erected 2002 by Sons of Confederate Veterans (See end of text).
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans marker series.
 
Location. 35° 47.831′ N, 88° 23.428′ W. Marker is in Parkers Crossroads, Tennessee, in Henderson County. Marker can be reached from Tennessee Route 22 0.6 miles north of Interstate 40, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wildersville TN 38388, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle of Parker's Crossroads (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Parker's Crossroads (a few steps from
Freeman's Battery Gun image. Click for full size.
By David Graff, April 24, 2012
3. Freeman's Battery Gun
Cannon near Freeman's Battery Monument.
this marker); Parker's Crossroads (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tides of War (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Parker's Crossroads (about 300 feet away); Morton's Battery (about 300 feet away); Forrest's West Tennessee Raid (about 400 feet away); Forrest's Tactics (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parkers Crossroads.
 
More about this marker. The monument is at Tour Stop 1 of the Parker's Crossroads Driving Tour near a cannon that is visible from Route 22.
 
Regarding Freeman's Battery. The monument has a Sons of Confederate Veterans 1896 emblem on the front and an engraving of an artillery unit and gun on the back. It is topped by a symbolic pyramid of cannonballs.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 9, 2014, by David Graff of Halifax, Nova Scotia. This page has been viewed 305 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 9, 2014, by David Graff of Halifax, Nova Scotia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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