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Glasgow in Barren County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Attack on Fort Williams

 
 
Attack on Fort Williams Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, July 23, 2012
1. Attack on Fort Williams Marker
Inscription.
October 6, 1863

One October 6, 1863 Confederate Col. John M. Hughes, commanding 129 men of the 25th Tennessee Infantry, attacked Fort Wiliams. The 37th Kentucky Mounted Infantry, some 420 men under the command of Maj. Samuel Martin, garrisoned the fort. At the time of the attack 50 men were camped in the court house square and 30 men were out on patrol. At dawn Col. Hughes attacked the men on the square. He then moved onto the fort. He later reported, "We killed 9, wounded 26 and captured 226, together with quartermaster's stores in the amount of $250,000.00. My loss was 1 killed and 4 wounded." The Union prisoners were marched to the Tennessee line where they were paroled.

Maj. Martin's report was somewhat different. He stated that the Confederates had captured 142 men, confiscated 200 horses, 100 carbines, saddles and clothing and had robbed the local bank of $9,000. He reported 13 Confederates wounded, 4 of whom later died. More Union troops arrived in Glasgow the day following the attack and Fort Williams remained in Union control for the rest of the war.

Just four days before the attack on the fort Maj. Martin reported to Gen. Jeremiah T. Boyle "I can keep all of the Rebels now at the Cumberland River out of this place and can whip them anywhere I find them." Perhaps
Bottom left photo image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, July 23, 2012
2. Bottom left photo
The Confederates quickly dispersed the soldiers of the 37th Kentucky who were charged with defending Glasgow.
Martin's over confidence, coupled with new recruits and a lack of discipline, allowed a much smaller Confederate force to rout the Union defenders.

This is just one of the many sites along the John Hunt Morgan Trail. Brochures highlighting the entire trail are available at visitor information centers along the route.
 
Erected by Civil War Discovery Trail.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail in Kentucky marker series.
 
Location. 36° 59.876′ N, 85° 55.52′ W. Marker is in Glasgow, Kentucky, in Barren County. Marker is on Fort Williams Way south of Cross Street, in the median. Touch for map. Marker is at the east end of Fort Williams near several other wayside-style markers. Marker is in this post office area: Glasgow KY 42141, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Defending Glasgow (here, next to this marker); General Joseph H. Lewis (here, next to this marker); Fort Williams (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Williams (approx. 0.2 miles away); Glasgow Municipal Cemetery (approx.
Top left photo image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, July 23, 2012
3. Top left photo
The surprised soldiers at Fort Williams managed a couple of volleys before they were overrun by the men of the 25th Tennessee.
0.3 miles away); Billy Vaughn (approx. 0.7 miles away); Barren County World War I Monument (approx. 0.7 miles away); Luska Joseph Twyman (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Glasgow.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Bottom right photo image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, July 23, 2012
4. Bottom right photo
The defenders of Glasgow were marched to the Tennessee line and paroled by their Confederate captors.
Attack on Fort Williams Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, July 23, 2012
5. Attack on Fort Williams Marker
Marker 72389 in background
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 29, 2014, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 350 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 29, 2014, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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