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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement

 
 
Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 4, 2013
1. Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker
Inscription. On August 28, 1963, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, D. C. On that same day a victory for equal rights occurred here, as segregation ended at Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, which used to occupy this site. Achieving this milestone took nearly ten years of protests, culminating in two demonstrations on July 4, and 7, 1963. About 400 people were arrested, including over 20 Catholic, Protestant and Jewish clergy. It was a memorable time when people of different faiths and ethnicities took part in a Civil Rights demonstration. Negotiations followed that resulted in the park finally being open to all on August 28, 1963. The first African American child to go on a ride that day took a spin on the merry-go-round. In 1972, Hurricane Agnes destroyed the amusement park, but the merry-go-round survived and was later moved to the National Mall in Washington, near where Dr. King gave his famous speech.

(Plaque at the base of the marker) Dedicated July 2013 by Baltimore County, Gwynn Oak Community Association and Security Woodlawn Business Association.
 
Location. 39° 19.583′ N, 76° 43′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is on Gwynn Oak Avenue. Touch for map. The marker is about 50 feet
Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 4, 2013
2. Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker
Plaque at the base of the marker
in from the parking lot of Gwynn Oak Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5900 Gwynn Oak Avenue, Gwynn Oak MD 21207, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Leakin Park at the Crimea Estate (approx. 1.5 miles away); Caretaker House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Chapel (approx. 1.6 miles away); Franklintown's Historic Roots (approx. 1.6 miles away); Norman Van Allan Reeves (approx. 1.6 miles away); Dickeyville's Historic Legacy (approx. 1.7 miles away); Crimea Mansion (approx. 1.7 miles away); Crimea (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. Civil RightsEntertainment
 
Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 4, 2013
3. Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker
Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 4, 2013
4. Gwynn Oak Park and the Civil Rights Movement Marker
Sign at the entrance to the park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 7, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 903 times since then and 45 times this year. Last updated on April 7, 2014. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 7, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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