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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Washington in Sullivan County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Birthplace of the Seventh Day Adventist Church

 
 
Birthplace of the Seventh Day Adventist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson, January 26, 2005
1. Birthplace of the Seventh Day Adventist Church Marker
Inscription. In April 1842, a group of citizens in this town banded together to form "the first Christian Society." In the Adventist movement of 1842-43, they espoused the Advent hope. In January 1842, these Washington Sabbathkeepers, after meeting for many years as a loosely knit group, organized the first Seventh Day Adventist Church. Take second left, opposite the Common, 2.3 miles on the Millen Pond Road to the site of this building.
 
Erected by New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. (Marker Number 94.)
 
Location. 43° 10.41′ N, 72° 5.581′ W. Marker is in Washington, New Hampshire, in Sullivan County. Marker is on South Main Street (New Hampshire Route 31), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington NH 03280, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pierce Homestead (approx. 8.3 miles away); Stoddard Glass (approx. 9.4 miles away); Stone Arch Bridges (approx. 9.8 miles away); John Sargent Pillsbury (approx. 12.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The actual church building is several miles away, but the access road is maintained only in
Birthplace of the Seventh Day Adventist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson, January 26, 2005
2. Birthplace of the Seventh Day Adventist Church Marker
the summer.
 
Regarding Birthplace of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. The origin of the Seventh-day Adventists can be traced to the Millerite Movement of the 19th Century. This movement was largely responsible for what has been called the Great second advent awakening. William Miller (1782-1849) was a farmer who settled in upstate New York after the war of 1812.

Ellen Harmon (later known by her married name Ellen White) joined with other Adventists, including Joseph Bates, and her husband James White to form a small group of Baptist, Methodist, Congregational and Presbyterian believers in Washington NH. The church was formally organized as the Seventh-day Adventist Church.
 
Also see . . .  Seventh Day Adventist - Wikipedia. (Submitted on April 27, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 25, 2014, by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 344 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 25, 2014, by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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