Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Stockton in Pecos County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of Comanche Springs

 
 
Site of Comanche Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, August 30, 2019
1. Site of Comanche Springs Marker
Inscription.  Used as a watering place and camping ground by Indians since pre-Columbian times, the springs were possibly visited about 1536 by Spaniard Cabeza de Vaca on his wanderings through Texas. The expedition of Juan de Mendoza, with his party of Spaniards and Jumano Indians, camped near the waters in 1684.

The six major, gushing springs and the beautiful river they formed resulted from water seeping up through geological faults to the earth's surface. The reservoir which supplied them was located in the formation known as "Trinity Sands".

The springs, among the largest in all Texas, were one of the few good watering places in this arid region. They supplied Indians raiding into Mexico on the nearby Comanche war trail and also gold seekers traveling to California on the southern route, 1849 and later. Butterfield Overland Mail stage stopped here as well, and after 1859 the springs provided water for Fort Stockton, which was founded both to protect the mail and stop the Comanche raids.

The springs began to be tapped for irrigation as early as 1875, but today irrigation projects to the north and west have reduced the underground
Site of Comanche Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
2. Site of Comanche Springs Marker
water supply so much that the Springs no longer flow.
 
Erected by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 4757.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Butterfield Overland Mail, the Comanche Trail into Mexico, and the San Antonio-El Paso Road marker series.
 
Location. 30° 53.118′ N, 102° 52.538′ W. Marker is in Fort Stockton, Texas, in Pecos County. Marker is on Spring Drive near East 1st Street. On Spring Dr. at entrance to Rooney Park, Ft. Stockton. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Stockton TX 79735, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); O. W. Williams (about 400 feet away); Koehler's Saloon and Store (about 400 feet away); Hovey School (about 600 feet away); Fort Stockton Guard House (about 600 feet away); Fort Stockton Officers' Quarters (approx. mile away); Annie Riggs Hotel (approx. mile away); Grey Mule Saloon (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Stockton.
 
Also see . . .  Comanche Springs from Handbook of Texas Online. (Submitted on September 26, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansNatural ResourcesNotable Places
 
Site of Comanche Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, August 30, 2019
3. Site of Comanche Springs Marker
Marker in context of entrance to Rooney Park image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, November 20, 2006
4. Marker in context of entrance to Rooney Park
Comanche Springs Swimming Pool image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
5. Comanche Springs Swimming Pool
The main springs of Comanche Springs is now a swimming pool.
Comanche Springs Swimming Pool image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 25, 2012
6. Comanche Springs Swimming Pool
Photo showing natural rock outcroppings that were part of the original main springs.
 

More. Search the internet for Site of Comanche Springs.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 6, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 26, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,179 times since then and 54 times this year. Last updated on April 28, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. Photos:   1. submitted on October 6, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.   2. submitted on September 26, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   3. submitted on October 6, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.   4. submitted on September 26, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   5, 6. submitted on September 24, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement