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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
West Milford in Passaic County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hasenclever Iron Trail

 
 
Hasenclever Iron Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 12, 2013
1. Hasenclever Iron Trail Marker
Inscription.
Welcome to the Hasenclever Iron Trail. This yellow blazed trail follows, for the most part, a road built over 230 years ago between the ironworks here at Long Pond and those at Ringwood Manor five miles away. Ironmaster Peter Hasenclever was running operations at both sites. He started building Long Pond in 1766, and it is believed the road you will be following was built shortly thereafter. It was in existence by the 1770s, as it is shown on maps drawn by Robert Erskine.

This historic interpretive trail has 14 numbered stops along its length, with informative signs at most of the stops. A brochure with map is available at the Long Pond Visitors Center and Ringwood Manor. As you walk the trail, imagine what it would have been like 200 years ago. Today the route of the old road is quiet and scenic. When the ironworks operated it would have been a more active road, with people traveling by foot and horseback between the two ironworks and Peterís Mine. The area the trail covers would have had more activity going on around it, with farms, charcoal making and mining operations that are now extinct.

( Sidebar : )
This drawing is of a typical charcoal iron furnace like the one now in ruins in front of you, built by Peter Hasenclever in 1766. In the drawing, the area where the two men are working below is called
Hasenclever Iron Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 12, 2013
2. Hasenclever Iron Trail Marker
the casting house. The casting house here was on the foundation remains to the left. The bellows in the lower center of the drawing were on the opposite side of the furnace remains from where you are, and the waterwheel was to the right of the furnace remains. The elevated walkway in the drawing, the charging bridge, came from the hill behind the furnace to the top of the 25 foot high stack. The ingredients for making iron – iron ore, charcoal and limestone – were carted over the bridge and fed into the top of the furnace. Inside the furnace, the temperature was raised by forced air from bellows. These operated off a cam shaft turned by a waterwheel. The water turning the wheel here came down a raceway that began up the Wanaque River. When the ore melted enough to do a casting, the molten iron was tapped from the furnace, and it flowed into a prepared sand bed, usually into a mold pattern as in the drawing. This pattern reminded the workers of a mother pig feeding her young – hence the term “pig iron”. The cast iron was then taken to a forge or foundry and worked further into wrought iron products.
 
Erected by The Friends of Long Pond Ironworks Inc.
 
Location. 41° 8.74′ N, 74° 18.688′ W. Marker is in West Milford, New Jersey
Marker in the Long Pond Ironworks Historic District image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 12, 2013
3. Marker in the Long Pond Ironworks Historic District
The ruins of the furnace can be seen behind the marker.
, in Passaic County. Marker can be reached from Greenwood Lake Turnpike, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located on a trail in the Long Pond Ironworks Historic District. Marker is in this post office area: West Milford NJ 07480, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The First Furnace (here, next to this marker); The Ringwood Furnaces at Hewitt (a few steps from this marker); Water Power (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Water Wheel Pit (about 500 feet away); Weighing Scale Remains (about 500 feet away); The Company Store (about 500 feet away); Long House Ruins (approx. 0.2 miles away); Steam Powered Sawmill Remains (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Milford.
 
More about this marker. The drawing referred to in the sidebar is at the top center of the marker. At the top left is a map of the Hasenclever Iron Trail. At the bottom center of the marker is a photograph of “The furnace after excavation in 1967. The remains of the casting house foundation are in the foreground. The bellows house foundation is in the left rear.”
 
Also see . . .  The Friends of Long Pond Ironworks website. (Submitted on June 13, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & Commerce
 
Hasenclever Iron Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 12, 2013
4. Hasenclever Iron Trail Marker
Remains of the Casting House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 12, 2013
5. Remains of the Casting House
Long Pond Furnace Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 12, 2013
6. Long Pond Furnace Ruins
Waterwheel image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 12, 2013
7. Waterwheel
This waterwheel powered the furnace at the Long Pond Ironworks. It is located just north of the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 13, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 307 times since then and 21 times this year. Last updated on May 12, 2014, by Paul E Frost of Greenwood Lake, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on June 13, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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