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Orlando in Orange County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan

 
 
Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan Marker-Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, May 21, 2013
1. Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan Marker-Side 1
Inscription. (side 1)
Aaron Jernigan moved to what is now Orlando in 1843 after the passage of the Armed Occupation Act of 1842 that opened vast areas of Florida for settlement. According to the law, one could move onto land at least two miles from an established fort, erect a home, and become a citizen-soldier. After defending the land from Indians for five years, the homesteader would receive title to 160 acres.

Jernigan cleared land and built a cabin on the northwest shore of Lake Holden, about two miles from Fort Gatlin. Early in 1844, Jernigan moved his wife Mary and their children, his Negro slaves, and 700 head of cattle to his homestead. When Florida became a state in 1845, he was elected Orange County's first representative to the state legislature. In all, Jernigan acquired 1200 acres of land.

Although the Second Seminole War ended in 1842, Indian uprisings and cattle rustling continued to be a problem. In 1846, Aaron had to leave Tallahassee to protect his herds. He built a stockade on the north shore of Lake Conway in 1849, and 80 residents plus their slaves quickly moved in for protection and remained there for almost a year. Jernigan became the captain of a local militia that patrolled the area for renegade Indians in 1852 but was able to disband the same year once the Seminoles were convinced to stop
Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan Marker-Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, May 21, 2013
2. Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan Marker-Side 2
their raids.
(Continued on other side)

(side 2)
(Continued from other side)
By 1850, the Jernigan home had become the nucleus of a village named Jernigan which had a U.S. Post Office and was indicated as a settlement on early Florida maps. But, as more settlers moved to the area, the new town of Orlando replaced the small village.

Jernigan and some of his sons were accused of killing a man at Orlando's log cabin post office in 1859. Orlando had no jail, so the Jernigans were transported to Ocala where they escaped. Legend has it that Aaron moved to Texas where he lived for 25 years. He eventually returned to the area and died in Orlando in 1891. He was buried at the Lake Hill Cemetery in Orlo Vista, Florida.
 
Erected by Orange County:
Richard T. Crotty, Mayor
Linda A. Stewart, Commissioner District 4, Orange County Board of County Commissioners.
 
Location. 28° 30.766′ N, 81° 23.247′ W. Marker is in Orlando, Florida, in Orange County. Marker is at the intersection of Alamo Drive and 29th Street, on the left when traveling south on Alamo Drive. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Orlando FL 32805, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured
Wide view of the Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan Marker image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, March 16, 2014
3. Wide view of the Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan Marker
as the crow flies. Atlantic Coastline Station (approx. one mile away); Carver Court Public Housing Complex (approx. 1.4 miles away); a different marker also named Carver Court Public Housing Complex (approx. 1.4 miles away); Site of Fort Gatlin (approx. 1.8 miles away); Fort Gatlin 1838 (approx. 1.8 miles away); Mount Pleasant Baptist Church (approx. 1.8 miles away); Mathew Robinson Marks (approx. 2.2 miles away); Linton E. Allen Memorial Fountain (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Orlando.
 
Also see . . .  Aaron Jernigan: Postmaster, Legislator - Murder Suspect - Orlando Sentinel. It would be nice if all of Orange County's founding fathers had been solid, upstanding citizens - the kind of people for whom we gratefully build statues and name streets. But that wasn't always the case. (Submitted on March 16, 2014, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 14, 2013, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. This page has been viewed 697 times since then and 74 times this year. Last updated on May 13, 2014, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 14, 2013, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida.   3. submitted on March 16, 2014, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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