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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ooltewah in Hamilton County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

County of James

The Lost County of Tennessee

 

1871 - 1919

 
County of James Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 22, 2014
1. County of James Marker
Inscription. Created out of rivalry of political factions during the reconstruction period following the Civil War, James County consisted of parts of Hamilton and Bradley counties. Plagued by political strife and supported mainly by farmers unable to provide an adequate tax base, its forty-eight year history ended in bankruptcy and its territory became a part of Hamilton County.
 
Erected by the Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 2A-88.)
 
Location. 35° 4.301′ N, 85° 3.619′ W. Marker is in Ooltewah, Tennessee, in Hamilton County. Marker is at the intersection of Church Street and Mulberry Street, on the right when traveling east on Church Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9508 Church Street, Ooltewah TN 37363, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Confederate Cemetery (approx. 4.1 miles away); Harrison Academy (approx. 5.3 miles away); Cleburne's Fort (approx. 5 miles away); Old Harrison (approx. 5.8 miles away); Joseph Vann's Town (approx. 5.9 miles away); Bonny Oaks School
The third courthouse of (the now defunct) James County image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 22, 2014
2. The third courthouse of (the now defunct) James County
(approx. 6.9 miles away); Tennessee Valley Railroad And Museum (approx. 8.3 miles away); “Old Dallas” (approx. 9.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  James County History. (Submitted on May 23, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Political SubdivisionsPolitics
 
Now a wedding chapel !! image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 22, 2014
3. Now a wedding chapel !!
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 23, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 297 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 23, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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