Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

When Lynchburg Was “Lunchburg”

 
 
When Lynchburg Was “Lunchburg” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
1. When Lynchburg Was “Lunchburg” Marker
Inscription. During the First World War, many people across the country knew Lynchhurg as “Lunchburg.” The City earned this nickname because of its famous Red Cross Canteen Service to soldiers traveling by train through Lynchburg. From 1917 to I919, dedicated and patriotic young women of the Lynchburg Red Cross dispensed food and cheer to thousands of troops at the Southern Railway Station on Kemper Street.

“Lunchburg” became a nationally-recognized canteen (or refreshment) stop because most trains carrying troops from training camps in the South to embarkation ports in the North passed through Lynchburg.

Operating from its “hut” at the Southern Railway Station, the Canteen Service prepared and served light refreshments to servicemen, including coffee, tea, sandwiches, fruit, cakes, and candy. The all-volunteer staff handed out magazines, postcards, and cigarettes, comforted ill soldiers, and treated minor injuries in a small hospital rom. Their smiling faces and words of cheer boosted the morale of American troops headed to war “over there” in Europe.

Lucille McWane Watson, Commandant of the Lynchburg Red Cross Canteen Service, remembered that “during the intense heat of the summer of 1918 a troop train commander wired in for drinking water. When the train arrived,
When Lynchburg Was “Lunchburg” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
2. When Lynchburg Was “Lunchburg” Marker
barrels, tubs and coolers full of clear ice water were waiting along the platform, enough for 500 thirsty travel-worn men.”

Images courtesy of the Lynchburg Museum System
 
Location. 37° 24.859′ N, 79° 9.495′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Taylor Street and 4th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Life and Death (here, next to this marker); History of the Stapleton Station (here, next to this marker); Lynchburg, Virginia, 1864 (a few steps from this marker); Station House Museum (a few steps from this marker); Lynchburg’s First Public Hanging, 1830 (within shouting distance of this marker); Hermon Methodist Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Chapel and Columbarium (about 300 feet away); Ivy Chapel Union Church (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
Also see . . .  Station House Museum. Old City Cemetery (Submitted on May 29, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkRailroads & StreetcarsWar, World I
 
Station House Museum image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher
3. Station House Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 29, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 530 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 29, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3. submitted on May 27, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement