Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Barney Circle in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Historic Congressional Cemetery

 

—National Register of Historic Places —

 
Historic Congressional Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 23, 2010
1. Historic Congressional Cemetery Marker
Inscription.

Historic
Congressional Cemetery
listed in the
National Registry of Historic Places
and
District of Columbia Landmarks

 
Erected by U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 52.962′ N, 76° 58.734′ W. Marker is in Barney Circle, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from the intersection of E Street, SE and 18th Street/Potomac Avenue, SE, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is adjacent to the administration building off E Street, on the east pillar of the cemetery's main gate. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1801 E Street, SE, Washington DC 20003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Heroes of 1814 (a few steps from this marker); General Peterson Goodwyn (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Elbridge Gerry (about 400 feet away); John Philip Sousa (about 600 feet away); U.S. Arsenal Explosion Memorial (about 600 feet away); Barney at Bladensburg (about 700 feet away); "The Healing Poles" (approx. 0.2 miles away); Seafarers Yacht Club (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barney Circle.
 
Also see . . .
Historic Congressional Cemetery - marker is visible on the gate pillar next to the building image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 27, 2010
2. Historic Congressional Cemetery - marker is visible on the gate pillar next to the building

1. Association for the Preservation of Historic Congressional Cemetery (APHCC}. (Submitted on December 26, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Library of Congress: Historic American Landscapes Survey. ...The landscape echoed the strata of Washington society, with the wealthy buying strategically located family plots, and individual burial sites relegated to the site's outer edges. Indigents, African-Americans and 'infidels' were given grave sites outside the cemetery's walls. The landscape of Congressional Cemetery still reflects the form of these social structures. ... (Submitted on December 26, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

3. Congressional Cemetery. ... Congressional Cemetery is also known for allowing members of the APHCC to walk dogs off-leash on the cemetery grounds. In addition to their annual dues, K-9 Corps members pay an additional fee for the privilege of walking their dogs in one of Washington's great open spaces. K-9 Corps members provide about one-third of Congressional Cemetery's operating income. Dog walkers follow a set of rules and regulations and provide valuable volunteer time to restore and beautify this historic place. The K-9 Corps program is recognized as providing the impetus for the revitalization of Congressional Cemetery, which had fallen into tremendous disrepair and neglect prior to the program's creation. In 2008,
Historic Congressional Cemetery - view from E Street image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 27, 2010
3. Historic Congressional Cemetery - view from E Street
Note the cemetery chapel in the background at right, the restored Latrobe cenotaphs across the cemetery drive; and the slope of East Capitol Hill, downward toward the Anacostia River beyond the trees.
the Association restricted K-9 membership, and placed restrictions on dogwalkers as the program became more popular.[ (Submitted on December 27, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Christ Church, Washington Parish Burial Ground; East Capitol Hill; Benjamin Henry Latrobe, DC Surveyor of Public Works; Benjamin B. French; Leonard R. Matlovich; dog park.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesLandmarksMilitaryNotable Persons
 
Historic Congressional Cemetery chapel image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 23, 2010
4. Historic Congressional Cemetery chapel
Close-up of restored Congressional cenotaphs image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 23, 2010
5. Close-up of restored Congressional cenotaphs
- memorials designed by Latrobe to commemorate early Senators and Congressional Representatives who died while in office and interred elsewhere.
<center>Memorial to Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients Lee Shapiro and James Lindelof image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 24, 2010
6.
Memorial to Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients Lee Shapiro and James Lindelof
- film makers killed in Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation, 1987.
"A Gay Vietnam Veteran" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 23, 2010
7. "A Gay Vietnam Veteran"
- memorial to Sgt. Leonard R. Matlovich, USAF. "When I was in the military, they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one."
Historic Congressional Cemetery: "The Healing Pole Memorial" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 24, 2010
8. Historic Congressional Cemetery: "The Healing Pole Memorial"
by Jewell Praying Wolf James, master carver.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 842 times since then and 31 times this year. Last updated on May 30, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on December 26, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on December 27, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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