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Travisville in Pickett County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Affair at Travisville

War Comes to Tennessee

 
 
Affair at Travisville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 17, 2014
1. Affair at Travisville Marker
Inscription. The first military action of the Civil War in Tennessee occurred on September 29, 1861 at Travisville. The blood spilled in this brief engagement brought the reality of the conflict home to the people of the Cumberland Mountains. Confederate Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer had acted forcefully to establish control over the border region of Tennessee and Kentucky. When bands of mounted men took Federal forage and military supplies, Union Col. William A. Hoskins marched his 12th Kentucky Infantry to Albany, Kentucky. The regiment joined with the loyal Home Guards in several counties to protect Unionist families from these raids.

After receiving reliable information that Confederate soldiers were camped thirteen miles away from Albany near the Methodist church in Travisville, Hoskings detailed Capt. John A. Morrison and a company of the 1st Kentucky Cavalry to reconnoiter the camp and capture it if possible. When surprised and ordered to surrender, the 100 Southern troops first attempted a defense but then fled under heavy fire into the surrounding hills. Four Confederates were killed in the affair and four were captured. One of the dead, James M. Saufley, is buried here in a marked grave. The Federal cavalrymen brought the prisoners back to Kentucky, where they were released after taking an oath of allegiance to the United States.
Close up of map shown on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 17, 2014
2. Close up of map shown on the marker
The men of Morrison’s company were the first Union troops to cross into Tennessee after the war began.

“Colonel, I fired several rounds, captured one soldier and two horses, and looked for more, but they were all gone.” — Pvt. Thomas Huddleston, 1st Kentucky Cavalry.

(sidebar)
James M. Saufley, a graduate of a law school in Louisville, Ky., who was killed in the Travisville engagement, is buried in the cemetery here. According to a postwar memoir written by a staunch Unionist, former Kentucky congressman James S. Chrisman, a secessionist uncle of Saufley, induced the young man to join the Confederate camp. James Ferguson, a brother of the notorious Champ Ferguson, allegedly shot Saufley.

(captions)
(upper center) Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer Courtesy Library of Congress
(upper right) Map of Middle and East Tennessee, 1862 - Courtesy Library of Congress
(lower right) James M. Saufley grave marker
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 34.888′ N, 84° 59.837′ W. Marker is in Travisville, Tennessee, in Pickett County. Marker is on Travisville
Affair at Travisville at entrance to the Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 17, 2014
3. Affair at Travisville at entrance to the Cemetery
Cemetery Road 0.1 miles east of Caney Creek Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is located at the entrance to the Travisville Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Pall Mall TN 38577, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Affair at Travisville (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fentress County / Pickett County (approx. 1.4 miles away); Sgt. Alvin C. York Educational Legacy (approx. 3 miles away); Wolf River Valley (approx. 3.3 miles away); Sgt. Alvin C. York's Personal and Spiritual Life (approx. 3.3 miles away); Sgt. York at Work (approx. 3.4 miles away); Alvin and Gracie York's Home and Farm (approx. 3.4 miles away); Sgt. Alvin C. York - America's Greatest Civilian Soldier (approx. 3.4 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
James M. Saufley Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
4. James M. Saufley Gravestone
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 18, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 8, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 311 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 8, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   4. submitted on October 17, 2016, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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