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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Nashville in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

First Steam Locomotive

 
 
First Steam Locomotive Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 18, 2014
1. First Steam Locomotive Marker
Inscription. On Dec. 13, 1850, the first steam engine, Tennessee No. 1, ordered by the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, arrived on the steamboat "Beauty" from Cincinnati. The one-mile trip on improvised tracks from the wharf to the S. Cherry St. crossing required 4 days by mule power. A one mile trial run was made from this point on Dec. 27, 1850.
 
Erected 2011 by The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. (Marker Number No. 41.)
 
Location. 36° 8.568′ N, 86° 45.918′ W. Marker is in Nashville, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker is on 4th Avenue S. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nashville TN 37210, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Patrick Catholic Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Tom Wilson Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); Major Henry M. Rutledge (approx. 0.4 miles away); Felix K. Zollicoffer (approx. 0.4 miles away); William Driver (approx. 0.4 miles away); Gen. Sam G. Smith (approx. 0.4 miles away); William Carroll (approx. 0.4 miles away); Richard S. Ewell (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nashville.
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
First Steam Locomotive Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 18, 2014
2. First Steam Locomotive Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 12, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 348 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 12, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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