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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Berlin in Coos County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Boom Piers

 
 
Boom Piers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 19, 2006
1. Boom Piers Marker
Inscription. The small man-made 'islands' in the river were used to secure a chain of boom logs which divided the Androscoggin River during the colorful and dramatic annual log drives, when the Brown Paper Company and the International Paper Company shared the river from the forests far upriver to the mills at Berlin. The logs were stamped on the ends with a marking hammer to identify their ownership, and they were sorted at a 'sorting gap' further upriver. The log drives ended in 1963. The old piers continue to serve as a reminder of North Country heritage.
 
Erected 1989 by New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. (Marker Number 159.)
 
Location. 44° 29.188′ N, 71° 10.006′ W. Marker is in Berlin, New Hampshire, in Coos County. Marker is on Main Street (New Hampshire Route 16), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. The marker is located in a small roadside rest area, on the east side of highway 16, overlooking the Androscoggin River. Marker is in this post office area: Berlin NH 03570, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Maynesborough's First Residence (approx. 1.8 miles away); The Nansen Ski Jump (approx. 3.2 miles away); The Ravine House (approx. 9.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Beyond the marker you can see the remains of the boom piers in the middle of the river.
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
<i>100,000 Cords of Wood, Burgess Sulfite Fibre Company, Berlin, N.H.</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1910
2. 100,000 Cords of Wood, Burgess Sulfite Fibre Company, Berlin, N.H.
The scale of the annual log drives is made evident by the images on this and the succeeding postcard - enormous mountains of logs.
<i>A Mountain of Wood, Million Dollar Log Pile, Berlin, N.H.</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1927
3. A Mountain of Wood, Million Dollar Log Pile, Berlin, N.H.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 11, 2013, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 350 times since then and 20 times this year. Last updated on June 19, 2014, by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. Photos:   1. submitted on December 11, 2013, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on September 19, 2015. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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