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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
North in Mathews County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Field Fortifications

Defensive Earthworks

 
 
Field Fortifications CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 22, 2014
1. Field Fortifications CWT Marker
Inscription.  During the Civil War, many of the officers on both sides—even those who gained fame as infantry or cavalry commanders—were first trained as engineers at the United States Military Academy at West Point or the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia. Using long-established principals, they were skilled at designing and overseeing the construction of complicated works that provided protection for those who manned them, as well as fields of fire to repel attacking forces. Lt. William H. Clarke, who supervised the construction here, utilized several fortification types in designing Fort Nonsense, including the redan, the redoubt, and the lunette.

The redan, derived from the French word for “projection and salient,” consists of two faces joined to form a salient angle projecting toward the enemy and the path of an expected attack. The projecting V fortification at Fort Nonsense was designed for infantry use.

A redoubt, from the French word meaning “place of retreat,” is usually an enclosed defensive emplacement outside a larger defensive system, or an independent
Field Fortifications CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 22, 2014
2. Field Fortifications CWT Marker
position. Fort Nonsense was technically a redoubt.

Derived from the French word for “little moon,” a lunette is an outer field work that forms a salient facing the enemy but is open on the side facing away from the enemy.

(captions)
(lower left) Confederate fortifications, Big Bethel, Harper's Weekly, Apr. 26, 1862
(upper right) Redan, redoubt, and lunette, from The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War (1891-1895)
 
Erected 2014 by Virginia Civil WarTrails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 27.994′ N, 76° 26.663′ W. Marker is in North, Virginia, in Mathews County. Marker can be reached from Windsor Road (Virginia Route 3) 0.2 miles north of John Clayton Memorial Highway (Virginia Route 14), on the right when traveling north. Located along the walking trail in Fort Nonsense Historical Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: North VA 23128, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Nonsense (here, next to this marker); By Land And By Sea (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Nonsense (within shouting distance
Fort Nonsense image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 22, 2014
3. Fort Nonsense
of this marker); Mathews County (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War In Mathews County (within shouting distance of this marker); John Clayton, Botanist (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Civil War In Mathews County (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Civil War In Mathews County (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in North.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for Field Fortifications.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 22, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 345 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 22, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3. submitted on June 23, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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