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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winchester in Clark County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

A Long, Steep Road

 
 
A Long, Steep Road Wayside Exhibit image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
1. A Long, Steep Road Wayside Exhibit
Inscription.
Hauling Supplies
This trail follows the road that took soldiers and supplies from the road below to the earthwork above. It is uncertain whether the military built the road or simply improved an existing trail or road.

The men and supplies at the earthwork came from Lexington, the main supply depot for the Union army in this region of Kentucky. Supplies for the Bluegrass were shipped from Cincinnati to Lexington on the Kentucky Central Railroad. A spur line ran to Nicholasville but supplies destined for other points had to be hauled overland. In all likelihood, the supplies and equipment necessary to build the earthwork, and then to garrison it, came from Lexington along the road through Athens to Boonesboro (the Civil War spelling of Boonesborough) and then up this steep road.

The construction equipment needed to build the earthwork was not extensive. Shovels, picks, axes, saws, and other hand tools were all that was necessary. But the soldiers working here and later stationed here needed food, clothing, tents, cooking utensils, lanterns, and other supplies. All of these materials had to be transported up this steep road. This road, like most roads of the time, was muddy in wet weather and rutted and dusty in dry weather. This road was also steep. Mules pulling wagons loaded with supplies must
Mule-drawn supply wagons brought everything needed to supply the earthwork image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
2. Mule-drawn supply wagons brought everything needed to supply the earthwork
have found it slow going.

Bringing up Water
Another vital supply had to be brought up this steep road -- water. Water was necessary for drinking and cooking. Regulations required that each man wash his hands and face at least twice a day, before meals. There is no natural water source on the ridge top. All of the water used at the earthwork had to be hauled from the river in barrels transported on wagons or sleds, such as the one shown above.

As you walk this trail, think of the difficulty involved in hauling everything you needed up this road.

Building the Road
This road was built, or at least improved, by soldiers working under the direction of an army engineer, perhaps Captain Thomas B. Brooks. Manpower and hand tools were all that was available to improve this short but important stretch of road. The work detail here probably resembled that in the photo to the left.
 
Erected by The Winchester/Clark County Tourism Commission.
 
Location. 37° 53.403′ N, 84° 15.615′ W. Marker is near Winchester, Kentucky, in Clark County. Marker can be reached from Ford Road/4 Mile Road (Kentucky Route 1924) 1.2 miles south of Boonesboro Road (Kentucky Route 627), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map
Building the Road image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
3. Building the Road
Men of the New York Volunteer Engineers constructing a road on the North Anna River, Virginia
. The exhibit can be reached from the parking area on KY Route 1924. The trailhead is at the edge of the parking area here. This wayside exhibit can be found partway up the trail that leads to the fort at the top of the hill. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1250 Ford Road, Winchester KY 40391, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Roads in the Wilderness (here, next to this marker); The Quest for Land (a few steps from this marker); The Eye of the Rich Land (a few steps from this marker); Defending the Kentucky River (a few steps from this marker); Three Confederate Raids (a few steps from this marker); Rock and Man (within shouting distance of this marker); Common Cliffside Plants (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas B. Brooks, Army Engineer (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. This marker is part of the historic site known as the "Civil War Fort at Boonesboro." CAUTION: The climb up the hill is VERY steep.
 
Also see . . .  Civil War Fort at Boonesboro. (Submitted on June 23, 2014.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesRoads & VehiclesWar, US Civil
 
Bringing up Water image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
4. Bringing up Water
An illustration showing how water was transported
A Long, Steep Road Wayside Exhibit image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, June 1, 2014
5. A Long, Steep Road Wayside Exhibit
This view shows the marker and the walking trail that leads up the hill.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 23, 2014, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 370 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 23, 2014, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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