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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santa Fe in Santa Fe County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

1610

 

—Commemorative Walkway Park —

 
1610 Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
1. 1610 Marker
Inscription. New Mexico’s third governor, Pedro de Peralta was instructed to relocate the capital to a more central location. He founded the Villa de Santa Fe, or Town of Holy Faith. The villa was named for a city of Spain built by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabel, Santa Fe, Granada, which is now a sister city. Established in 1610 Santa Fe is the oldest capital city in the United States.
 
Erected 1886 by The Inn at Loretto. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Location. 35° 41.367′ N, 105° 56.007′ W. Marker is in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in Santa Fe County. Marker is on Paseo de Peralta near Otero Street. Touch for map. It is at Hillside Park. Marker is in this post office area: Santa Fe NM 87501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1680 (a few steps from this marker); 1598 (a few steps from this marker); 1848 (a few steps from this marker); 1692 (a few steps from this marker); 1540 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1776 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1912 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Fe.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to
1610 Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
2. 1610 Marker
this marker. This is a list of all 21 markers on Santa Fe’s Commemorative Walkway at Hillside Park. There is a link on the list to a map of all markers on the walkway.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia Entry for Pedro de Peralta. “San Gabriel was remote from the main Pueblo Indian population centers. Juan de Oñate had planned to move the capital south to the Santa Fe River valley. Peralta selected a defensible site with ample available land and a good water supply for the town, which he called Santa Fe. He and his surveyor laid out the town, including the districts, house and garden plots and the Santa Fe Plaza for the government buildings. These included the governor’s headquarters, government offices, a jail, arsenal and a chapel. On completion, the plaza could hold ‘1,000 people, 5000 head of sheep, 400 head of horses, and 300 head of cattle without crowding.’ The palace was built for defense with three-foot-thick adobe walls. The Palace of the Governors is now the oldest continuously occupied building in the United States, and as of 1999 housed the Museum of New Mexico.” (Submitted on August 13, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
Pedro de Peralta Giving Direction to a Surveyor image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
3. Pedro de Peralta Giving Direction to a Surveyor
Detail of 1992 statue “The Founding of Santa Fe” by sculptor Dave McGary at Don Pedro De Peralta Park a few blocks west on Paseo De Peralta at Grant Avenue.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 13, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 271 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 13, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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