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Remsen in Oneida County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Baron Von Steuben: Father of the American Infantry

 
 
Baron Von Steuben: Father of the American Infantry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
1. Baron Von Steuben: Father of the American Infantry Marker
Inscription.
Early Training
Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard August von Steuben is perhaps best known in this country for turning a motley assortment of untrained American colonists into an effective fighting force capable of defeating the powerful British army on 1783. Born in Magdeburg, Prussia, in 1730, Steuben began his military career by enlisting in the Prussian army at age 16. By 1760, Frederick the Great chose Steuben for his general staff. Discharged in 1763 at the end of the European Seven Yearsí War, Steuben held various appointments in Prussiaís principalities before volunteering his military talents to the Continental Army and the American Revolution.

Creating a Professional Army
In the winter of 1777-1778, Steuben reported to General Washington at Valley Forge where he found a demoralized army without supplies and near starvation. Under Steubenís direction, using a modified Prussian training exercise, the Continental recruits became disciplined, professional soldiers who grew to appreciate his genuine concern for their welfare. Impressed with Steubenís accomplishments, Washington created the position of Army Inspector General and appointed Steuben to this new responsibility with the rank of Major General. On October 19, 1781, having been awarded his own field command, Steuben was one of three division commanders
Baron Von Steuben: Father of the American Infantry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
2. Baron Von Steuben: Father of the American Infantry Marker
at Yorktown when British General Lord Cornwallis offered to surrender.
 
Location. 43° 20.233′ N, 75° 14.011′ W. Marker is in Remsen, New York, in Oneida County. Marker can be reached from Star Hill Road (County Route 57), on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located at the parking lot in Steuben Memorial State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Remsen NY 13438, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Paying Tribute to the Baron (here, next to this marker); From Obscure Grave Site to Public Memorial (here, next to this marker); Steuben State Memorial Park (within shouting distance of this marker); This Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Sacred Grove (within shouting distance of this marker); Steuben (within shouting distance of this marker); General Baron Frederick William von Steuben (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); German-American Organizations (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Remsen.
 
More about this marker. The marker contains copies of two paintings. One depicts Steuben and has a caption of “Baron von Steuben (1730-1794), by Ralph Earl, 1786.” It is reproduced through the courtesy of the New York State Historical
Marker in Steuben Memorial Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
3. Marker in Steuben Memorial Park
Several markers can be found at this location. The Father of the American Infantry marker is seen here on the left.
Association, Cooperstown. The other is The Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown on 19 October 1781, by John Trumbull, 1787. It has a caption of “Steubenís men were in position on the front when Cornwallisís offer to surrender came through the lines. Their location and Steubenís accomplishments afforded him the honor of standing with Washington and Lafayette at the actual surrender. In Trumbullís painting, George Washington is on horseback in front of the American flag. To his left, on horseback, are Thomas Nelson of Virginia, the Marquis de Lafayette, and Baron von Steuben. Courtesy of Yale University Art Gallery, Trumbull Collection.” † On the left side of the marker is a “Copy of letter from Benjamin Franklin and Silas Deane to George Washington, September 4, 1777, introducing the baron. Benjamin Franklin, an envoy of the Continental Congress in Paris, met Steuben there and recognized that his military experience would be invaluable to the fight for American independence.” † The right of the marker contains a picture of Steuben's Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States, with a caption of “Steuben understood that the American troops needed a simple, standardized drill manual. He drafted instructions in longhand, which were translated by his secretaries and were then published as Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States. The U.S. military still uses part of Steubenís manual, or ĎBlue Book,í today.”
 
Also see . . .  Biography of Friedrich Wilhelm Augustus von Steuben. (Submitted on August 13, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 13, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 293 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 13, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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