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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santa Fe in Santa Fe County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

1862

 

—Commemorative Walkway Park —

 
1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
1. 1862 Marker
Inscription. Shortly after the Civil War began, the Confederacy turned its attention to the Southwest, and in February, 1862, three thousand three hundred troops under the command of Confederate General Sibley, defeated the Union troops at Valverde, raised the Confederate flag, and occupied Santa Fe. The Confederates were defeated two weeks later in the Battle of Glorieta Pass.
 
Erected 1986 by Knights of Columbus. (Marker Number 11.)
 
Location. 35° 41.379′ N, 105° 55.995′ W. Marker is in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in Santa Fe County. Marker can be reached from Paseo de Peralta near Otero Street. Touch for map. It is in Hillside Park. Marker is in this post office area: Santa Fe NM 87501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1776 (here, next to this marker); 1692 (a few steps from this marker); 1912 (a few steps from this marker); 1680 (a few steps from this marker); 1926 (a few steps from this marker); 1945 (a few steps from this marker); 1960 (a few steps from this marker); 1976 (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Fe.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This is a list of all 21 markers
1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
2. 1862 Marker
on Santa Fe’s Commemorative Walkway at Hillside Park. There is a link on the list to a map of all markers on the walkway.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia Entry for the Battle of Valverde. “The Battle of Valverde, or the Battle of Valverde Ford from February 20 to February 21, 1862, was fought near the town of Valverde” (no longer in existence) in present-day Socorro County 165 miles from Santa Fe, “at a ford of Valverde Creek in Confederate Arizona, in what is today the state of New Mexico. It was a major Confederate success in the New Mexico Campaign of the American Civil War. The belligerents were Confederate cavalry from Texas and several companies of Arizona militia versus U.S. Army regulars and Union volunteers from northern New Mexico and Colorado.” (Submitted on August 15, 2014.) 

2. Wikipedia Entry for the Battle of Glorieta Pass. “The Battle of Glorieta Pass, fought from March 26 to 28, 1862 in northern New Mexico Territory, was the decisive battle of the New Mexico Campaign during the American Civil War. Dubbed the ‘Gettysburg of the West’ (a term that ‘serves the novelist better than the historian’) by some authors, it was intended as the killer blow by Confederate forces to break the Union possession of the West along the base of the Rocky Mountains. It was fought at Glorieta Pass
Brigadier General Henry Hopkins Sibley (1816–1886) image. Click for full size.
By Matthew Brady (Library of Congress Collection via Wikimedia Commons), circa 1865
3. Brigadier General Henry Hopkins Sibley (1816–1886)
in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in what is now New Mexico, and was an important event in the history of the New Mexico Territory in the American Civil War.

“There was a skirmish on March 26 between advance forces from each army, with the main battle occurring on March 28. Although the Confederates were able to push the Union force back through the pass, they had to retreat when their supply train was destroyed and most of their horses and mules killed or driven off. Eventually, the Confederates had to withdraw entirely from the territory back into Confederate Arizona and then Texas. Glorieta Pass thus represented the peak of the campaign.” (Submitted on August 15, 2014.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 15, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 319 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 15, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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