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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santa Fe in Santa Fe County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

1876

 

—Commemorative Walkway Park —

 
1876 Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
1. 1876 Marker
Inscription. While the nation was celebrating the Centennial, Santa Fe was into its 266th year. Although the Treaty of Guadalupe Hildago guaranteed the property of Hispanics and Indians, problems in the interpretation of Spanish and Mexican land laws worked to the disadvantage of these landholders. Many of their claims continued to appear in the courts into the 1980’s.
 
Erected 1986 by the Ytuarte Family. (Marker Number 12.)
 
Location. 35° 41.391′ N, 105° 55.986′ W. Marker is in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in Santa Fe County. Marker can be reached from Paseo de Peralta near Otero Street. Touch for map. It is in Hillside Park. Marker is in this post office area: Santa Fe NM 87501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1712 (a few steps from this marker); 1776 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1692 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1912 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1926 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1945 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1821 (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Fe.
 
Related markers.
1876 Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
2. 1876 Marker
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This is a list of all 21 markers on Santa Fe’s Commemorative Walkway at Hillside Park. There is a link on the list to a map of all markers on the walkway.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia Entry for Spanish land grants in New Mexico. “The Spanish, and later the Mexican, government encouraged settlement of the Territorio de Nuevo Mexico by the establishment of large land grants, many of which were turned into ranchos, devoted to the raising of cattle and sheep. The owners of these ranchos patterned themselves after the landed gentry in Spain. Their workers included Native Americans, some of whom had learned to speak Spanish and ride horses. Of the hundreds of grants, Spain made only a few. The remainder were granted by Mexico after 1821. The ranchos established land-use patterns that are recognizable in the New Mexico of today.

“Land grants were made both to individuals and communities during the Spanish (1598–1821) and Mexican (1821–1846) periods of New Mexico’s history. Nearly all of the Spanish records of land grants that were made in what is now New Mexico prior to the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 were destroyed in the revolt. Thus, historians can often only be certain of land grants that were made after the Spanish Reconquest of New Mexico in 1693. "The two major types of land grants were private grants made to individuals,
Final Course of the Commemorative Parkway image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2014
3. Final Course of the Commemorative Parkway
This marker is behind the photographer. It was an uncharacteristic overcast day in Santa Fe.
and communal grants made to groups of individuals for the purpose of establishing settlements. Communal land grants were also made to Pueblos for the lands they inhabited.” (Submitted on August 15, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Government
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 15, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 229 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 15, 2014, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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