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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brookeville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Refuge

United States Capital for a Day

 

—Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail —

 
A Refuge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
1. A Refuge Marker
Inscription. Many Washington residents fleeing the British invasion in August 1814 converged on this quiet village. Brookeville also provided a haven for hungry soldiers as they headed for Baltimore following the American Defeat at Bladensburg.

On August 26, an exhausted President Madison arrived at the home of postmaster Caleb Bentley, where "all hands went to work to prepare supper and lodging for him" and his companions.

"It is against our principles to have anything to do with war, but we receive and relieve all who come to us." -- Henrietta Bentley, quoted by Margaret Bayard Smith, August 1814

Safekeeping

The message "You had better remove the records," alerted President Madison that an attack was imminent and the nation's important documents should be secured outside the city. Senate papers and money from Washington banks were sent to Brookeville.
 
Erected 2014 by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 39° 10.818′ N, 77° 3.512′ W. Marker is in Brookeville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on High Street (Georgia Avenue) (Maryland
A Refuge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
2. A Refuge Marker
Route 97), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in front of the Brookeville Academy. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5 High Street, Brookeville MD 20833, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Newlin’s Mill Millstone (a few steps from this marker); August 26, 1814 (within shouting distance of this marker); Brookeville (within shouting distance of this marker); Brookeville Angel (within shouting distance of this marker); In This House (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Madison House (about 700 feet away); Bentley House (about 700 feet away); Historic Brookeville (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brookeville.
 
Also see . . .  Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail Sign Unveiled in Brookeville. by Sonya Burke, Montgomery Community Media. (Photos and Video) (Submitted on August 21, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
Three Markers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
3. Three Markers
at the Brookeville Academy
Bentley House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
4. Bentley House
The home of local Quakers Caleb and Henrietta Bentley where the president stayed is called "Madison House," and Brookeville became known as "United States Capital for a Day."
Close-up of Elizabeth Simonson painting on marker
United States Capital for a Day image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
5. United States Capital for a Day
Close-up of banner on marker
Madison Riding into Brookville<br>Aug. 26, 1814 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
6. Madison Riding into Brookville
Aug. 26, 1814
Close-up of Elizabeth Simonson painting on marker
Madison Working at Bentley House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
7. Madison Working at Bentley House
President Madison's guards stood watch as he worked through the night at the Bentley home.
Close-up of Gerry Embleton painting on marker
Bentley House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 20, 2014
8. Bentley House
In 2014, Madison House is the home of Sandy and Duane Heiler.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 20, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 303 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on August 20, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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