Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wabash in Wabash County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Treaty of 1826 Meeting Camp

Paradise Spring Riverwalk

 
 
Treaty of 1826 Meeting Camp Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 13, 2014
1. Treaty of 1826 Meeting Camp Marker
Inscription. In the early 1820's, the northern half of Indiana had very little white settlement.
The Miami and Potawatomie Indians had suffered serious defeats at the hands of General Anthony Wayne along the Maumee River (1794) and William Henry Harrison at the Battle of Tippecanoe (1811). However, they still held the rights to the land in this area.
There was a need for additional land for white settlement and the need to establish a canal system along the Wabash River.

In 1826, Congress made an appropriation to hold a treaty meeting with the purpose of acquiring additional land from the Indians. Governor James B. Ray of Indiana, Governor Lewis Cass of Michigan, and Captain John Tipton were appointed commissioners to represent the U.S. government.
Captain Tipton was assigned the task of locating a site for the meeting. This location was chosen as it was centrally located with many favorable natural features. These features included a plentiful spring and enough open land to construct the treaty camp.
The treaty camp was constructed in the spring and summer of 1826. The treaty meeting took place in October of 1826 and lasted approximately two weeks. On October 26, 1826 the Miami and Potawatamie Indians surrendered the rights to their land in northern Indiana and southern Michigan.
The signing of the Treaty of 1826
Treaty of 1826 Meeting Camp Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 13, 2014
2. Treaty of 1826 Meeting Camp Marker
Located in front of the Cook's Cabin
allowed for white settlement of this land and the construction of the Wabash and Erie Canal.

The original treaty camp consisted of ten buildings. The reconstruction of the camp began in 1987 and is based on a reliable description provided in the 1836 writings of Elijah Hackleman.
 
Location. 40° 47.834′ N, 85° 48.93′ W. Marker is in Wabash, Indiana, in Wabash County. Marker can be reached from E. Market Street 0.2 miles east of S. Allen Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in the northern part of Paradise Spring Park west of the parking lot; the above directions are to the driveway to the park’s northeast parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Wabash IN 46992, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cook's Cabin (a few steps from this marker); Council House (a few steps from this marker); Quarters of James B. Ray (a few steps from this marker); Quarters of Lewis Cass (a few steps from this marker); Storage Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Quarters of Major General John Tipton (within shouting distance of this marker); Quarters of Captain Frederick R. Kintner (within shouting distance of this marker); Kin-Com-A-Ong Spring (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wabash.
 
Also see . . .
Council House and Commissioners Cabins image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 13, 2014
3. Council House and Commissioners Cabins

1. Treaty Grounds. Article by Ron Woodward. (Submitted on August 27, 2014.) 

2. Indian Treaty of 1826 - Treaty Deliberations. Article by Historian Carl Leiter. (Submitted on August 27, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Council House and Storage Cabins image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 13, 2014
4. Council House and Storage Cabins
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 27, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 196 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 27, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
Paid Advertisement