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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newport in Carteret County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bogue Sound Blockhouse

Vermonters’ Spirited Resistance

 
 
Bogue Sound Blockhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
1. Bogue Sound Blockhouse Marker
Inscription. Company K, 9th New Jersey Volunteers, built the Bogue Sound Blockhouse here in the summer of 1862 to guard the junction of the Bogue Sound Road and Newport Road. Protected by a surrounding ditch and earthworks, the log blockhouse was armed with one howitzer. Early in 1864, Lt. Alfred C. Ballardís Company B, 9th Vermont Infantry, occupied the site.

In January 1864, Confederate Gen. James G. Martinís force of almost 2,000 men advanced from Wilmington toward Morehead City to support Gen. George E. Pickettís expedition to recapture New Bern, N.C. About noon on February 2, Martinís advance guard approached along the road from your right and prepared to attack the blockhouse, which was a short distance in the woods to your left. Confederate artillery opened fire on the blockhouse, covering Company A, 17th North Carolina Infantry, which was deployed as skirmishers to attack it. About 200 yards from the blockhouse, the Confederate skirmish line charged. Ballardís 62-man Vermont contained forty new recruits who had received their rifles only three hours earlier. After a spirited resistance, Ballardís men broke in disorder, abandoning the blockhouse and earthworks, and retreated east to Morehead City. Ballard lost two men wounded and eight captured. The Confederates suffered no losses in the attack. After burning the blockhouse, Martinís
Close up of the map on the Bogue Sound Blockhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
2. Close up of the map on the Bogue Sound Blockhouse Marker
Attack on Bogue Sound Blockhouse, February 2, 1864
forces continued to Newport Barracks, which they captured late that afternoon.

The earthwork remains of the blockhouse site, extant for more than a century, were demolished in the 1990s for a housing development.

(captions)
(upper center) The Bogue Sound Blockhouse
(upper right) Attack on Bogue Sound Blockhouse, February 2, 1864.
(lower right) Gen. James G. Martin - Courtesy of N.C. State Archives; Lt. Alfred C. Ballard - Courtesy of the Vermont Historical Society
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 34° 44.044′ N, 76° 50.26′ W. Marker is in Newport, North Carolina, in Carteret County. Marker is at the intersection of McCabe Road and North Carolina Highway 24, on the left when traveling north on McCabe Road. Touch for map. The marker is located at the east entrance to Gethsemane Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Newport NC 28570, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. SS Pevensey (approx. 2.8 miles away); Newport Barracks (approx. 3.2 miles away); a different marker also named Newport Barracks
Bogue Sound Blockhouse-Gethsemane Cemetery Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
3. Bogue Sound Blockhouse-Gethsemane Cemetery Entrance
(approx. 3.7 miles away); N.C. State Highway Patrol (approx. 4.8 miles away); Carolina City (approx. 4.8 miles away); Siege of Fort Macon (approx. 4.9 miles away); Camp Glenn (approx. 4.9 miles away); a different marker also named Carolina City (approx. 5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newport.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Bogue Sound Blockhouse Marker over looking Gethsemane Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 16, 2014
4. Bogue Sound Blockhouse Marker over looking Gethsemane Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 13, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 280 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 13, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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