Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Monumental Honor

 
 
A Monumental Honor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 15, 2008
1. A Monumental Honor Marker
Inscription. The Washington Monument is the first major public monument to George Washington. Originally, the Washington Monument was built so George Washington himself could stand on top of the column and look over one of America's great cities, and also keep an eye out for any enemies that could attack by sea. The monument is two hundred seventy feet tall so that when Washington stood atop his monument, his famously long coat tails would not touch the ground.
Unfortunately, the monument was not completed during his life and Italian sculptor Enrico Causici created a statue of Washington to adorn the monument. The Statue is Washington's actual size and weight, eighteen feet tall and it weighs seven tons. His coat tails were shortened due to safety concerns. 410 462 3832
 
Location. 39° 17.844′ N, 76° 36.944′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is at the intersection of Washington Place and Mt. Vernon Place, in the median on Washington Place. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Washington Monument (a few steps from this marker); To George Washington (a few steps from this marker); Lafayette Monument
A Monumental Honor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 15, 2008
2. A Monumental Honor Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Hackerman House (within shouting distance of this marker); Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Contributing to Society (within shouting distance of this marker); The Peabody Library (within shouting distance of this marker); The Peabody Conservatory (within shouting distance of this marker); A Monumental Mistake (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square: Mapping History. Description of this 2008 art installation. (Submitted on June 4, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Historical discrepancies
The claims made in the marker text may not all be correct. While the text claims that the monument was created so that Washington could look out over the city of Baltimore, this seems unlikely, given that the competition for the design of the monument was held in 1810, 11 years after Washington's death.
    — Submitted May 19, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.

2. Beyond the Compass Beyond the Square Art Exhibit - Not Historical Markers
A series of markers on this website all in Mount Vernon Place in Baltimore, Maryland are not true historical markers. They were part of an art exhibit entitled "Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square." The work of Maryland Institute College of Art students, this art installation included the work of Daniel Allende called "Mapping History." Information on this exhibit can be found here: http://www.mica.edu/beyond/mappinghistory.html.

The "plaques" were meant to be humorous and not real historical information. A careful reading will reveal their true nature.

These markers include the following:

Marker ID 7720 A Monumental Honor
Marker ID 7721 Freedom and Equality For All
Marker ID 7722 Romance of a Romantic
Marker ID 7723 The Axe and the Cherry Tree
Marker ID 7724 A Monumental Mistake
Marker ID 7725 A Place of Invention
Marker ID 7726 Structures of Restriction

As the exhibit is now over, these "markers" are no longer in place and should be removed from this database.
    — Submitted June 4, 2008, by Fred B. Shoken of Baltimore, Maryland.

3. Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square: Mapping History
This "historical marker" was one of seven installed by Maryland Institute College of Art sophomore Daniel Allende as part of the 2008 exhibit Beyond the Compass, Beyond the Square. While marker text has some basis in truth, exaggerations become quickly apparent when one takes the time to read the text. In addition to the insight the marker provides about the history of Mount Vernon Square, it also helps to illustrate how often historical markers are taken for granted, almost unseen, and how they could say most anything, yet still be unnoticed.
    — Submitted June 4, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.

 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 2,251 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 16, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.
Paid Advertisement