Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Warsaw in Duplin County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The War Comes to Warsaw

Lewis's Railroad Raid

 

—Confederate Lifeline —

 
The War Comes to Warsaw Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 18, 2014
1. The War Comes to Warsaw Marker
Inscription. During the war, the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad was part of a rail network that transported vital supplies north to Confederate forces in Virginia. Cutting that line became an important Union objective.

On July 5, 1863, Lt. Col. George W. Lewis’s 3rd New York Cavalry struck Warsaw at 6 a.m., after burning the Confederated States Armory at Kenansville the day before and emptying a safe (now on display at the Duplin County Veterans Museum) of a large amount of Confederate money. Lewis’s primary mission was to demolish Wilmington and Weldon Railroad track. His troopers destroyed two miles of track and telegraph wire, removing the wire and cutting down the poles.

Here in Warsaw, two rail cars, a freight house full of Confederate stores, about 4,000 barrels of resin and turpentine, and some gunpowder were destroyed. Lewis’s men took about 150 head of livestock and several bags of mail with them when they left, as well as 30 prisoners. About 400 black men, women, and children followed the Union forces as they rode away, back east through Kenansville toward Trenton in the afternoon. En route, the Federals burned a barn containing hundreds of pounds of bacon, the aroma filled the air here for several days thereafter.

Lewis’s departure may have been prompted in part by the proximity of four companies of Confederate
Close up of the map on The War Comes to Warsaw Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 18, 2014
2. Close up of the map on The War Comes to Warsaw Marker
infantry and four artillery pieces stationed ten miles south of here at Magnolia. A locomotive pulled fourteen empty boxcars to Magnolia from Warsaw to fetch the troops before Lewis arrived; however, they did not come, and his attack and withdrawal were unimpeded.

(captions)
(lower left) Federal cavalrymen destroying railroad track - Courtesy Library of Congress
(upper right) Ca. 1845 Pierce-Bowden House, W. Hill St., a Confederate hospital during the war - Courtesy Leon Sikes
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 0.102′ N, 78° 5.466′ W. Marker is in Warsaw, North Carolina, in Duplin County. Marker is at the intersection of East Hill Street and North Center Street, on the left when traveling east on East Hill Street. Touch for map. The marker is on the grounds of the Duplin County Veterans Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 119 East Hill Street, Warsaw NC 28398, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Henry L. Stevens, Jr. (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Veteran’s Memorial (approx.
The War Comes to Warsaw Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 18, 2014
3. The War Comes to Warsaw Marker
2.5 miles away); James Kenan (approx. 3.2 miles away); Duplin Old Courthouse Site (approx. 3.2 miles away); Confederate Armory (approx. 7.5 miles away); Confederate States Armory (approx. 7.5 miles away); a different marker also named Confederate States Armory (approx. 7.5 miles away); Samson L. Faison (approx. 8.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Warsaw.
 
Also see . . .  Duplin County Veterans’ Museum. (Submitted on September 20, 2014.)
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Front view of the Duplin County Veterans Museum image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 18, 2014
4. Front view of the Duplin County Veterans Museum
Side View of the Duplin County Veterans Museum image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 18, 2014
5. Side View of the Duplin County Veterans Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 20, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 272 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 20, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement