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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Lee in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cannons

 
 
Cannons Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
1. Cannons Marker
Inscription. The word “cannon” is derived from the Latin canna, meaning tube, pipe or gun and dates back to the 13th Century. In the 1400’s, the term described a cylinder made from iron bars “soldered” together and fortified with iron hoops.

By the 18th Century, cannon barrels were cast in one piece and designated by the weight of the shot they fired. The largest weapons at Fort Lee were the 32 pounders which had an overall length of 10 feet and were able to develop a high muzzle velocity of up to 1,300 feet per second.

Loading and Firing
The gunnery crew, consisting of 7 to 12 men, inserted the powder charge and compacted it with a rammer. The projectile, either a solid shot or bar shot for ripping and splintering masts and rigging or an incendiary shell for setting ship decks afire – was loaded into the barrel. The cannoneer, sighting the target and depending on experience and long hours of practice, aimed the piece and ordered the cannon fired. A burning stick, or lint-stock, was used to ignite the powder in the vent.
 
Erected by Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Location. 40° 50.846′ N, 73° 57.861′ W. Marker is in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Touch for map
Marker in Fort Lee Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
2. Marker in Fort Lee Historic Park
This battery overlooks the Hudson River. In 1776, Fort Lee and Fort Washington, located on the other side of the river, sought to prevent British ships from sailing north of this point.
. Marker is in Fort Lee Historic Park on a walking trail to the south of the Visitor Center. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Lee NJ 07024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Historical Chronology 1776 (a few steps from this marker); The Barbette Battery (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Soldier Hut (about 400 feet away); Musketry Breastwork (about 500 feet away); Abatis Construction at Fort Lee (about 600 feet away); Military Magazine (approx. 0.2 miles away); The American Crisis (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mortar Battery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Lee.
 
More about this marker. The right side of the marker features a picture of a 32-pounder cannon, along with a rammer, sponge and lint-stock used to load and fire the piece.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follows the walking tour of Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Fort Washington. The American Revolution. (Submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Cannon Marker at Battery Walls image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
3. Cannon Marker at Battery Walls
Fort Lee Cannon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
4. Fort Lee Cannon Marker
The cannon marker is on a walking path at the extreme southern point of Fort Lee Military Park.
Battery Walls image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
5. Battery Walls
Battery Walls such as these protected the artillery crew from incoming fire.
Fort Lee Artillery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
6. Fort Lee Artillery
This is a display of various artillery at Fort Lee Historic Park. It contains a 32-pounder and a smaller cannon, as well as a mortar.
Cannon at Fort Lee image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 22, 2014
7. Cannon at Fort Lee
Continental soldiers at Fort Lee fire a cannon towards the Hudson River.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,613 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on February 8, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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