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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lawrence in Douglas County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Haskell Indian Nations University

 
 
Haskell Indian Nations University Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 2, 2014
1. Haskell Indian Nations University Marker
Inscription.

This project is dedicated to those who were here first.

Haskell Indian Nations University campus is a unique and special place. Please, respect these grounds and buildings as you walk around campus.

From 1884-1890, the school’s official name was the U.S. Indian Industrial Training School. The early government boarding schools involved removing children from their families and placing them in schools to give them training in domestic and farming skills. In 1884, the Indian [I]ndustrial Training School officially opened its doors with three buildings and a few Native students. Enrollment increased to 400 students by the end of the first school year.

In the beginning, the school was run under a semi-military system; the students’ traditional clothing and personal items were taken, their hair was cut and they had to march to class and to church. The students were taught to speak English. They were not allowed to speak their tribal language, to talk to siblings or to practice their tribal customs and traditions. Classes were taught at an elementary level. Boys were, also, taught skills in tailoring (they had to make their own uniforms), farming, wagon making, blacksmithing, harness making and shoe making. Girls were taught general homemaking skills, such as cooking and sewing. Most of the
Haskell Indian Nations University Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 2, 2014
2. Haskell Indian Nations University Marker
Marker on left. Looking east, with Memorial Arch in background
food was produced on the Haskell farm and students were expected to participate in the growing, harvesting and preserving of the farm food.
 
Erected by Haskell Indian Nations University.
 
Location. 38° 56.43′ N, 95° 13.956′ W. Marker is in Lawrence, Kansas, in Douglas County. Marker is on Barker Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is east opposite the Haskell Cultural Center & Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Lawrence KS 66046, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Haskell Indian Nations University Timeline (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Haskell Indian Nations University (here, next to this marker); War Mothers Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Haskell Celebration 1926 (within shouting distance of this marker); Haskell Stadium Memorial Arch (within shouting distance of this marker); Hiawatha Hall (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tecumseh Hall (about 500 feet away); Haskell Bandstand/Gazebo (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lawrence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Haskell Indian Nations University. (Submitted on September 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
Haskell Indian University Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
3. Haskell Indian University Sign

2. Haskell-related Records at National Archives. (Submitted on September 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Haskell Institute National Register Nomination. (Submitted on September 23, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EducationMan-Made FeaturesNative AmericansPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 208 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on September 20, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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