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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Lee in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Military Magazine

 
 
Military Magazine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
1. Military Magazine Marker
Inscription. The military magazine derives its name from the Arabic word, “Makhazin”, meaning granary, or storehouse. Revolutionary War magazines were constructed with emphasis on fire and waterproofing, easy accessibility to the guns serviced and security from enemy fire.

A typical magazine had thick native stone walls filled with soil which protected a massive brick archway where the munitions were housed. A wooden door leading to the storage area provided ready access to the gun-powder stores while minimizing the hazard of an enemy round striking the explosive powder.

To safeguard the munitions from adverse weather, a sloping board or shingled roof was built atop the stone walls to furnish a secure gunpowder storage area.

Gunpowder is a mixture of saltpeter, sulphur and charcoal. When compressed and ignited this black powder explodes and can propel shot or cannon balls from muzzle-loaded rifles, mortars and artillery.
 
Erected by Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Location. 40° 50.991′ N, 73° 57.796′ W. Marker is in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Touch for map. Marker is in Fort Lee Historic Park on a walking trail to the south of the Visitor Center. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Lee NJ 07024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker at Fort Lee Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
2. Marker at Fort Lee Historic Park
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mortar Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); Abatis Construction at Fort Lee (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Palisades Interstate Park (about 400 feet away); The American Crisis (about 400 feet away); Musketry Breastwork (about 500 feet away); Soldier Hut (about 500 feet away); The Barbette Battery (about 500 feet away); Fort Lee Historic Park (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Lee.
 
More about this marker. The top of the marker features a picture of a cross section of a magazine, showing a soldier stacking barrels or gunpowder.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follows the walking tour of Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Fort Washington. The American Revolution. (Submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
3. Blockhouse
No remains of the military magazine exist at Fort Lee Historic Park, but this blockhouse is located near the marker.
Blockhouse at Fort Lee image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
4. Blockhouse at Fort Lee
The blockhouse, as well as the marker, is on the walking trail south of the Visitor Center.
British and Hessian Troops at the Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 23, 2013
5. British and Hessian Troops at the Blockhouse
Battle at the Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 23, 2013
6. Battle at the Blockhouse
British troops attack Continental soldiers at the blockhouse in Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,631 times since then and 72 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on November 23, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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