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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Lee in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Historical Chronology 1776

 
 
Historical Chronology Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
1. Historical Chronology Marker
Inscription.
(1) July 12 - Fort Lee’s fortifications laid out. Together with Fort Washington on the opposite bank and aided by a river barrier, the twin fortresses are intended to thwart British control of the Hudson.

(2) July12 - General Howe’s forces land on Staten Island and through late-August amass 31,000 men.

(3) August 22 - British cross the Bay and engage Washington’s army five days later in the Battle of Long Island.

(4) September 15 - Howe’s troops, in pursuit of the Americans, land at Kip’s Bay.

(5) September 16 - Battle of Harlem Heights begins. After a month, Washington moves north while the British head for the East River.

(6) October 9 - Three British warships attempting to penetrate the river blockade and silence the protective batteries are repulsed.

(7) October 18 - After being repulsed at Throgs Neck, Howe’s forces land at Pell’s Point.

(8) October 28 - After regrouping, American and British armies fight the Battle of White Plains.

(9) November 16 - While Washington watches from Fort Lee, Howe successfully attacks Fort Washington capturing 2,800 defenders.

(10) November 19 and 20 - General Lord Cornwallis with over 5,000 troops invades New Jersey
Marker at Fort Lee Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
2. Marker at Fort Lee Historic Park
The marker is located on the walking trail south of the Visitor Center.
in Alpine. Fort Lee, its usefulness ended by the fall of Fort Washington, is evacuated. General Washington withdraws across New Jersey and captures Trenton on December 26th.
 
Erected by Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Location. 40° 50.851′ N, 73° 57.848′ W. Marker is in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Touch for map. Marker is in Fort Lee Historic Park on a walking trail to the south of the Visitor Center. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Lee NJ 07024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cannons ( a few steps from this marker); The Barbette Battery ( about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Soldier Hut ( about 400 feet away); Musketry Breastwork ( about 500 feet away); Abatis Construction at Fort Lee ( about 600 feet away); Military Magazine ( approx. 0.2 miles away); Mortar Battery ( approx. 0.2 miles away); The American Crisis ( approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Lee.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker contains a map showing the events mentioned on the marker.
 
Related markers.
Detail of Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
3. Detail of Battle Map
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follows the walking tour of Fort Lee Historic Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Fort Washington. The American Revolution. (Submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Washington's Retreat Through Jersey. (Submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable EventsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Hudson River Overlook image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
4. Hudson River Overlook
This photo, taken from the observation deck in front of the marker, looks toward Fort Washington in Manhattan. The bridge which connects the sites of these twin forts is named for George Washington.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,577 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 16, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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