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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Little Falls in Morrison County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Big White Pine

King of the Forest

 
 
Big White Pine Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 11, 2014
1. Big White Pine Marker
Inscription.

White pines once dominated northern Minnesota. Even in Lindbergh's time these scattered reminders of earlier eras dotted the pasture.

The trunk in front of you is the remains of one of these forest giants. This white pine stood 100-feet tall and was about four feet in diameter. It was struck by lightning in 1986 and died the following year. Lindbergh referred to this tree as the "sentry" because it stood so tall and watched over the farm.

Aging Trees
You can count this trunk's growth rings to figure out the age of this pine. Each year a tree grows new tissue, called springwood and summerwood, which results in a ringed appearance. This annual growth is like a birthday calendar.

Foresters don't cut down trees to count their rings. Instead they use a sharp instrument that bores a core sample from the tree. This determines the age of the tree and tells how fast it's growing.

[Photo caption reads]
The WPA built a fence around this remnant pine to protect it from visitors who might drive cars over its roots. A mere seedling in the early 1700s, this tree might have provided shade for fur traders and Ojibwe hunters.
Minnesota Historical Society
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This large white pine was struck by lightning
Big White Pine Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 11, 2014
2. Big White Pine Marker
in 1986 and died in 1987. It was about 280 years old, 48 inches in diameter and 120 feet tall.

In the 1800's, trees such as this one comprised the common forest canopy in the northeastern half of Minnesota. However, by the early 1900's most of them had been cut and sawn into lumber. Minnesota white pine lumber built homes in all of the lower 48 states.
 
Erected by Minnesota Historical Society and Minnesota Dept of Natural Resources.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Minnesota Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 45° 57.485′ N, 94° 23.449′ W. Marker is in Little Falls, Minnesota, in Morrison County. Touch for map. Markers and log are about 500 feet southwest of the Charles A. Lindbergh State Park entrance station, near the parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1615 Lindbergh Drive South, Little Falls MN 56345, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The WPA Builds a Park in the Rustic Style (within shouting distance of this marker); The Boyhood Farm of Charles Lindbergh (within shouting distance of this marker); Childhood Memories of a Magical Place (within shouting distance of this marker); WPA Water Tower & Shelter Building
Big White Pine Remnant and Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 11, 2014
3. Big White Pine Remnant and Markers
(within shouting distance of this marker); Tenant Farmer House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lindbergh House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lindbergh State Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Boyhood on the Mississippi (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Little Falls.
 
Also see . . .
1. Charles A. Lindbergh State Park MN. (Submitted on October 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Minnesota Logging Camps: The Early Years. (Submitted on October 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EnvironmentHorticulture & Forestry
 
Big White Pine Remnant image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 11, 2014
4. Big White Pine Remnant
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 270 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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