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Chuckwalla in Riverside County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Young Divisional Camp

Camp Young Headquarters Desert Training Center

 

—California-Arizona Maneuver Area —

 
Young Divisional Camp Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, June 5, 2010
1. Young Divisional Camp Marker
Inscription. Camp Young, named after Lt. Gen. S.B.M. Young, the 1st Army Chief of Staff, was established at this site in the Spring of 1942. It was one of twelve such camps built in the southwestern deserts to harden and train United States Troops for service to the battlefields of World War II. It was selected by Gen. George S. Patton Jr., as the administrative headquarters for the Desert Training Center, a simulated theater of operations that included portions of California, Arizona and Nevada. The other camps were Coxcomb, Granite, Iron Mountain, Ibis, Clipper, Pilot Knob, Laguna, Horn, Hyder, Bouse and Rice.

A total of 13 infantry divisions and 8 armored divisions plus numerous smaller units were trained in this harsh environment. The training center was in operation for almost 2 years and was closed early in 1944 when the last units were shipped overseas. During the brief period of operation over one million American soldiers were trained for combat.

This monument is dedicated to all the soldiers that served here, and especially for those who gave their lives in battle, ending the holocaust & defeating the armed forces of Nazi Germany, Facist Italy and Imperial Japan.
 
Erected 1988 by Billy Holcomb Chapter No. 1069, E Clampus Vitus, the Fourth Armored Division Association, the Fifth
Young Divisional Camp Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, June 5, 2010
2. Young Divisional Camp Marker
Armored Division & the 104th Infantry Division Association in co-operation with the Bureau of Land Bamanagement, Indio Resource Area. (Marker Number 53.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Desert Training Center, and the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 33° 39.854′ N, 115° 47.245′ W. Marker is in Chuckwalla, California, in Riverside County. Marker is at the intersection of Cottonwood Springs Road and unknown dirt road, on the right when traveling north on Cottonwood Springs Road. Touch for map. Marker is approximately 3,000 feet east of this intersection. Marker is in this post office area: Indio CA 92201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Barren or Bountiful (approx. 3.4 miles away); Desert Training Center (approx. 3.7 miles away); a different marker also named The Desert Training Center (approx. 3.7 miles away); a different marker also named Desert Training Center (approx. 3.7 miles away); California-Arizona Maneuver Area (approx. 3.7 miles away); Coachella Valley Recipients (approx. 3.7 miles away); 33-barreled Organs (approx. 3.8 miles away); Cannons (approx. 3.8 miles away).
 
Regarding Young Divisional Camp. Camp Young was selected by General George Patton, Jr.
Young Divisional Camp image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, June 5, 2010
3. Young Divisional Camp
as the Administrative Headquarters for the Desert Trianing Center/California Arizona Maneuver Area (DTC/CAMA). One of the first units reporting to the Desert Training Center, the 773rd Tank Destroyer Battalion, recorded in their official history, "Camp Young was the world's largest Army post and the greatest training maneuver area in U.S. military history. Eighteen thousand square miles of nothing, in a desert designed for Hell." SOURCE: Billy Holcomb Chapter 1069 35th Anniversary Plaque Book by Phillip Holdaway
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 18, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. This page has been viewed 592 times since then and 80 times this year. Last updated on November 3, 2014, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. Photos:   1. submitted on December 18, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   2, 3. submitted on December 24, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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