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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near North Bend in Hamilton County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

William Henry Harrison Tomb

 
 
William Henry Harrison Tomb Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
1. William Henry Harrison Tomb Marker
one of many markers with text at this site
Inscription. (Text same as Marker Title.)

(there are multiple other markers with text on this site)
 
Erected by Ohio Arheaological and Historical Society Wabash District Boy Scouts.
 
Location. 39° 9.042′ N, 84° 45.113′ W. Marker is near North Bend, Ohio, in Hamilton County. Marker is at the intersection of Cliff Road and Brower Road, on the right when traveling west on Cliff Road. Touch for map. marker is at the corner of Brower Rd., and Cliff Rd., west of US Rt 50, west of Cleves, Ohio, (there is no access between Brower Rd. and US 50). Marker is at or near this postal address: 35 Cliff Rd, North Bend OH 45052, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. William Henry Harrison Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Abraham Brower (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Cleves Symmes (about 700 feet away); William Henry Harrison / and the Cincinnati & Whitewater Canal (approx. 0.3 miles away); Benjamin Harrison (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fort Finney (approx. 3.6 miles away); Point Farm (approx. 3.6 miles away); Indiana - Ohio State Line Monument (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in North Bend.
 
Also see . . .
William Henry Harrison Tomb Historical Sketch image. Click for full size.
By Pat Filippone, July 17, 2013
2. William Henry Harrison Tomb Historical Sketch

1. William Henry Harrison. Find-a-Grave. (Submitted on March 21, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. What Really Killed William Henry Harrison?. By Jane McHugh and Philip A. Mackowiak,NY Times, March 31, 2014 (Submitted on March 21, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismPoliticsWar of 1812Wars, US Indian
 
William Henry Harrison Tomb Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
3. William Henry Harrison Tomb Marker
full view of first marker
William Henry Harrison Tomb image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
4. William Henry Harrison Tomb
full view of tomb site
William Henry Harrison Tomb image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
5. William Henry Harrison Tomb
one of the "eagle pillars"
William Henry Harrison Tomb Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
6. William Henry Harrison Tomb Entrance
door to the burial chamber
William Henry Harrison Tomb image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
7. William Henry Harrison Tomb
plaque on door of tomb
William Henry Harrison Tomb interior image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
8. William Henry Harrison Tomb interior
large bronze plaque with very long text, inside burial chamber. not accessible to the general public
William Henry Harrison Tomb image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
9. William Henry Harrison Tomb
stone marker, text is difficult to read
William Henry Harrison<br> 1773–1841<br>Born Berkeley, Charles County, Virginia image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
10. William Henry Harrison
1773–1841
Born Berkeley, Charles County, Virginia
This c. 1813 painting by Rembrandt Peale hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC

“The first battle of the War of 1812 actually occurred in 1811, with the Battle of Tippecanoe in the Indiana wilderness. As governor of the territory, William Henry Harrison faced increased resistance from Indian tribes forced from their homes by new settlers. Harrison met with Shawnee warrior chief Tecumseh at a tense council that nearly ended in violence and led in part to Tecumseh's alliance with the British during the subsequent war. With tensions rising, Tecumseh's brother Tenskwatawa (the Prophet) attacked Harrison's forces near Tippecanoe. The surprise strike resulted in heavy casualties for Harrison; however, the Indians left the field and Harrison then destroyed Tecumseh's stronghold, Prophet's Town, claiming the victory. A year later, Harrison. commanded the American forces at the Battle of the Thames, where Tecumseh was killed. In 1840 the slogan ‘Tippecanoe and Tyler too!’ propelled Harrison to the presidency.” — National Portrait Gallery
Harrison Memorial sign image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, October 14, 2014
11. Harrison Memorial sign
at corner of Miami Ave. and Brower Rd. in Cleves
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 10, 2014, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 304 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 10, 2014, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio.   2. submitted on April 23, 2015, by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on November 10, 2014, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio.   10. submitted on March 21, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   11. submitted on November 10, 2014, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page.
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