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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Saint Louis in Independence County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Dred and Harriet Scott

 
 
Dred and Harriet Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 16, 2014
1. Dred and Harriet Scott Marker
Inscription. Dred and Harriet Scott filed suit for their freedom at this courthouse in 1846. Their case reached the United States Supreme Court and was decided in 1857. The court ruled that the Scotts and all African Americans were not citizen of the United States. Opposition to the decision was one of the causes of the Civil War and led to the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution. The Scotts’ struggle for freedom stands as a defining moment in the history of the Civil Rights Movement.

Harry Weber, Sculptor

 
Erected 2012 by Dred Scott Heritage Foundation.
 
Location. 38° 37.528′ N, 90° 11.333′ W. Marker is in Saint Louis, Missouri, in Independence County. Marker is on North 4th Street near Market Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 50 North 4th Street, Saint Louis MO 63102, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Joseph Pulitzer (a few steps from this marker); La Rue Missouri (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Mississippi Valley Trust Company (about 600 feet away); Basilica of Saint Louis, King
Dred and Harriet Scott Statue image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 16, 2014
2. Dred and Harriet Scott Statue
(about 700 feet away); Merchant Laclede Building (about 700 feet away); The Gateway Arch (approx. ¼ mile away); In Memory of Robert E. Lee (approx. 0.3 miles away); Rue de l’Eglise (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Saint Louis.
 
More about this marker. The Dred and Harriet Scott statue is located in front of the Old Courthouse.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dred Scott - Wikipedia. In 1836 Dred Scott met a teenaged slave named Harriet Robinson whose slave owner was Major Lawrence Taliaferro, an army officer from Virginia. Taliaferro allowed Scott and Harriet to marry and transferred his ownership of Harriet to Dr. Emerson so the couple could be together. In 1838, Harriet gave birth to their first child, Eliza. In 1840, they had another daughter they named Lizzie. Eventually, they would also have two sons, but neither survived past infancy. (Submitted on November 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Dred Scott v. Sandford - Wikipedia. Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. 393 (1857), was a landmark decision by the
Dred and Harriet Scott Statue image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 16, 2014
3. Dred and Harriet Scott Statue
U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court held that African Americans, whether enslaved or free, could not be American citizens and therefore had no standing to sue in federal court, and that the federal government had no power to regulate slavery in the federal territories acquired after the creation of the United States.
(Submitted on November 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
Dred Scott image. Click for full size.
By Public Domain, n.d.
4. Dred Scott
Harriet Scott image. Click for full size.
By Public Domain, n.d.
5. Harriet Scott
Dred and Harriet Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By Pat Filippone, August 18, 2015
6. Dred and Harriet Scott Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 327 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   6. submitted on November 26, 2015, by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page.
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