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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Memorial Terrace

Monumental Church

 
 
Memorial Terrace image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher
1. Memorial Terrace
Inscription.
1788
This site was a part of the Academy of Sciences and Fine Arts where the Virginia Convention of 1788 voted to approve the proposed U.S. Constitution on June 25th.

1806
Richmond Theatre opened in three-story brick building.

1811
Theatre destroyed by fire on December 26th claiming 72 victims, including Governor George W. Smith and former U.S. Senator Abraham Venable. Dr. James McCaw and slave, Gilbert Hunt, saved many from the burning building.

1812
U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall headed the building committee to raise funds to erect a memorial on site.

1812
Robert Mills, first native born American architect and architecture student of Thomas Jefferson, designated the octagonal church with a Delorme dome.

1812-184
Construction of Monumental Church led by master builder, Isaac Sturdevant from Boston.

1814
First Episcopal service of Monumental Church held on May 4th.

1824
Marquis de Lafayette honored on October 31st at special church service.

1845-1850
Altar introduced, central pulpit removed, and upper windows in sanctuary enlarged.

1873-1874
Sunday school building added.

1878-1901
Stained
Memorial Terrace at Monumental Church image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 23, 2014
2. Memorial Terrace at Monumental Church
glass windows installed, including one Tiffany stained glass window.

1899
Mural of the Resurrection in the apse and fresco of Angel Gabriel on the dome painted.

1919
Virginia Commonwealth University, formerly Richmond School of Social Work and Public Health, moved to church vestry.

1965
Church deconsecrated and deeded to Medical College of Virginia Foundation.

1971
Designated as National Historic Landmark by National Park Service.

1976-1981
Medical College of Virginia Foundation begins restoration returning to the original Mills design.

1976
Sunday school building demolished.

1983
Medical College of Virginia Foundation deeded church to Historic Richmond.

1985-1987
Stained glass windows replaced with clear windows to replicate Mills design and roof restored with copper dome.

2003-2012
Historic Richmond completed $3.5 million restoration including replica of monument.

2014
Celebration of 200th anniversary, installation of Memorial Terrace and restoration of marbleized altar.

 
Erected 2014 by Historic Richmond.
 
Location. 37° 32.331′ N, 77° 
Memorial Terrace image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 23, 2014
3. Memorial Terrace
25.803′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of East Broad Street and College Street, on the right when traveling west on East Broad Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1224 East Broad Street, Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Virginia Convention of 1788 (a few steps from this marker); Monumental Church (a few steps from this marker); St. Philip's Way (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Philip School of Nursing (within shouting distance of this marker); Egyptian Building (within shouting distance of this marker); First African Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named First African Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Egyptian Building (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Disasters
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 24, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 275 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 24, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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