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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Saint Joseph in Buchanan County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Pony Express

St. Joseph, Missouri

 
 
The Pony Express Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 25, 2014
1. The Pony Express Monument
Inscription.

The National Significance of the Pony Express
The Pony Express ran from April 3, 1860, until the transcontinental telegraph was completed in October, 1861. The Pony Express proved that the Central Route to California could be traveled all year. Part of this route would later be used by the transcontinental railroad. By keeping government lines of communication open, the Pony Express also helped keep gold-rich California in the Union during the Civil War. The legend of the Pony Express has become a part of American folklore and a symbol of the courage and determination of the American spirit.

The Pony Express Organization
On Tuesday, April 3, 1860, at 7:15 P.M., a rider on horseback left St. Joseph, Missouri, and headed west. He was the first link in a horse relay mail system to Sacramento, California. The Pony Express was organized as a private business venture by well-known freighters, Russell, Majors and Waddell, to meet the demand of Californians for faster communication with the East. Mail would be delivered in 10 days - half the time of any other service. The organizers also hoped to gain a $1,000,000 government mail contract. When Congress awarded the contract, Russell, Majors and Waddell only received a portion of it. This was too little and too late to save the company from bankruptcy.
The National Significance of the Pony Express Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 25, 2014
2. The National Significance of the Pony Express Marker
However, the Pony Express had accomplished its purpose of rapid, reliable communication. It was a spectacular success for 18 months, and even today its fame endures around the world.

The Pony Express Trail
The route of the Pony Express from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California, was approximately 1,960 miles long. It ran across rivers and through prairies, plains, mountains and deserts. Relay stations, where a rider got a fresh horse, were 10 to 15 miles apart and home stations, where a new rider took the mail, were 75 to 100 miles apart. From St. Joseph, Missouri, the trail followed the Central Route to California through the present-day states of Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California.

The Pony Express Riders
Just over 100 riders were employed during the operation of the Pony Express. In early March, 1860, the following advertisement appeared in the Alta California newspaper:

"Wanted: young, skinny wiry fellows. Not over 18. Must be expert riders, willing to risk death daily. Orphans preferred. Wages $25 per week."

Although all were expert riders, few were orphans. The youngest rider was 11 and the oldest was in his forties. Each rider's route was approximately 100 miles. Sometimes evading hostile Indians, he rode day and night at about 10 miles an hour in all types of
The Pony Express Organization Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 25, 2014
3. The Pony Express Organization Marker
terrain and weather. The Pony Express rider was an example of the daring and boldness of the American character.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Pony Express National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 39° 46.059′ N, 94° 50.906′ W. Marker is in Saint Joseph, Missouri, in Buchanan County. Touch for map. Monument is in the island surrounded by Frederick Avenue (I-29 Business), 10th Street (I-29 Business), and Francis Street. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Joseph MO 64501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. War Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); SPC Edward "Eddie" Lee Myers (about 500 feet away); SPC Joshua James "Josh" Munger (about 500 feet away); Brian Jay Bradbury (about 500 feet away); Peace Officers Memorial (about 500 feet away); Replica of the Statue of Liberty (about 500 feet away); Krug Building (about 700 feet away); No Turning Back (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Saint Joseph.
 
Also see . . .
1. Pony Express National Historic Trail. (Submitted on November 30, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. National Pony Express Association. (Submitted on November 30, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
The Pony Express Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 25, 2014
4. The Pony Express Trail Marker

3. Pony Express National Museum. (Submitted on November 30, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. St. Joseph, Jumping Off to the West. (Submitted on November 30, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. AnimalsCommunications
 
The Pony Express Riders Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 25, 2014
5. The Pony Express Riders Marker
The Pony Express Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 25, 2014
6. The Pony Express Monument
Markers are inside the surrounding shrubs
The Pony Express Monument Statue image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 25, 2014
7. The Pony Express Monument Statue
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 30, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 305 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 30, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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