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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Confederate Men's Home

 
 
Confederate Men's Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, December 5, 2014
1. Confederate Men's Home Marker
Inscription. The Confederate men's home began in 1884 as a project of the John B. Hood Camp of United Confederate Veterans and was intended as a residence for disabled and indigent Confederate veterans. Potential residents were required to prove that they had served honorably in the Civil War, that they had a disability that prevented them from supporting themselves, and that they did not suffer from any contagious diseases.

The Albert Sidney Johnston Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy led fundraising efforts for the home. In 1886, the John B. Hood Camp purchased sixteen acres with a two-story building at 1600 West Sixth Street, and the Confederate Men's Home opened later that year. The home was operated by the Veterans' Camp with funding from public contributions until 1891, when oversight was assumed by the state of Texas. The State Legislature established the Board of Control to operate the home in 1920, and then in 1949, responsibility was transferred to the Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools. The site eventually grew to twenty-six acres and included a large administration building, living quarters, a hospital and private cottages.

From the time of its inception until the death of the last resident veteran in 1954, more than 2,000 Confederate veterans were admitted to the home. During the
Confederate Men's Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, December 5, 2014
2. Confederate Men's Home Marker
mid-twentieth century, the scope of the home shifted to include disabled veterans of the Spanish-American War and World War I, as well as mental health patients. The home operated until 1963, when residents were transferred to Kerrville, and the site’s buildings were razed in 1970.
 
Erected 2010 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16464.)
 
Location. 30° 16.553′ N, 97° 45.855′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker is at the intersection of West 6th Street and Campbell Street, on the right when traveling west on West 6th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1624 West 6th Street, Austin TX 78703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Austin High School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mathews School (approx. ¼ mile away); Clay Pit Bucket Tower (approx. 0.4 miles away); Clarksville (approx. 0.4 miles away); Travis County (approx. 0.4 miles away); Las Ventanas (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Johnson Home (approx. 0.4 miles away); Hezikiah Haskell House (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located NW corner of W. 6th St. & Campbell St. To visit the
Confederate Men's Home image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, December 5, 2014
3. Confederate Men's Home
Gateway Apartments on hills where the Confederate Men's Home was located.
marker, park in the nearby Gateway Apartments, on Campbell St. and walk to the marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Marker Dedication (video). Video taken by Descendants of Confederate Veterans soon after marker was dedicated. (Submitted on December 5, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

2. Confederate Woman's Home. Handbook of Texas Online article about Confederate Woman's Home north of Austin for widows and wives of honorably discharged Confederate soldiers. (Submitted on December 5, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Categories. War, Spanish-AmericanWar, US CivilWar, World I
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 5, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 359 times since then and 113 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 5, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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