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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Mitchell in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort Mitchell, 1864-1867

 
 
Fort Mitchell, 1864-1867 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
1. Fort Mitchell, 1864-1867 Marker
Inscription. Mitchell Pass and the city of Mitchell, Nebraska, derive their names from a military post built near here during the Indian Wars. No trace of the sod structure remains at the site on the North Platte River bend northwest of Scottís Bluff. It was named in honor of General Robert B. Mitchell, who ordered the establishment of several sub-stations of Fort Laramie to protect overland communications along the Great Platte River Road between Julesburg and South Pass.
Fort Mitchell was constructed and manned in the autumn of 1864 by Company “H” of the Eleventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry under Captain J.S. Shuman. In February 1865 they helped defend Mud Springs Station against an attack by Cheyenne. In June 1865 they rescued Fort Laramie troops ambushed by Sioux near Horse Creek. They chased Indians who tore down telegraph lines and attacked wagon trains and stage coaches.
Army records are meager, but there are eyewitness descriptions of the fort by Eugene Ware, John Bratt, and Margaret Carrington. An official ground plan and a sketch of 1866 by William H. Jackson reveal a stockade with sally-port, firing loop-holes, and a sentinel tower. A nearby “road ranch” served as the Scottís Bluff stage station. Fort Mitchell was abandoned after the Fort Laramie peace conference of 1867.
 
Erected by
Fort Mitchell, 1864-1867 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
2. Fort Mitchell, 1864-1867 Marker
Mitchell Bicentennial Committee & Nebraska State Historical Society. (Marker Number 190.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Nebraska State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 41° 51.441′ N, 103° 44.146′ W. Marker is near Mitchell, Nebraska, in Scotts Bluff County. Marker is on Old Oregon Trail Road near Nebraska Highway 92, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 173462 Old Oregon Trail Road, Mitchell NE 69357, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Fort Mitchell, 1864-1867 (approx. 0.7 miles away); Scott's Bluff Pony Express Station (approx. ĺ mile away); The Bullwhackers (approx. 2.1 miles away); Oregon Trail (approx. 2.1 miles away); The Way West (approx. 2.2 miles away); The River Route (approx. 2.2 miles away); Scott Memorial (approx. 2.3 miles away); Traces of the Trail (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mitchell.
 
Also see . . .  Nebraska Forts - Page 2 - Legends of America. The outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 stretched the Federal Governmentís resources for the West thin, making it increasingly difficult for the government
Scott's Bluff Pony Express Station stake image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
3. Scott's Bluff Pony Express Station stake
located to the right of the Fort Mitchell marker.

XP / Scottís Bluff / Station site / Pony Express / Trail 1860-1861

Dedicated August 2005, Rededicated June 2014
Site located: True azimuth 39 degrees and 3,206 feet
Sponsored by: Gregory & Kathy Franz - Jim Stretesky
Panhandle Monuments - Joe & Lois Fairfield
Pony Express Trail Association - Joe Nardone, Historian
to protect emigrants and other travelers on overland trails. Many U.S. soldiers went back East to fight for the Union, which weakened the frontier garrisons.
(Submitted on December 6, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWars, US Indian
 
Fort Mitchell by William Henry Jackson image. Click for full size.
By Wm. H. Jackson
4. Fort Mitchell by William Henry Jackson
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 6, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 252 times since then and 64 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 6, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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