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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near L'Anse-au-Loup in Division No. 10, Newfoundland and Labrador (Labrad, Newfoundland and Labrador — The Canadian Atlantic
 

The Diaphone

Lighthouse Trail

 
 
The Diaphone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2014
1. The Diaphone Marker
Inscription. The concrete foundations near the beach are the remains of a huge diaphone - a fog signal which produces a blast of two distinct tones. When it was installed (in) 1906 the diaphone was the latest in technology. It was operated by compressed air and produced a haunting seven-second blast every minute.
 
Location. 51° 27.631′ N, 56° 51.47′ W. Marker is near L'Anse-au-Loup, Newfoundland and Labrador, in Division No. 10, Newfoundland and Labrador (Labrad. Marker can be reached from L'Anse Amour Branch Road just from Trans-Labrador Highway (Newfoundland and Labrador Route 510), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: L'Anse-au-Loup, Newfoundland and Labrador A0K 3L0, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 21 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Marconi Station (within shouting distance of this marker); L’Anse Amour Burial (approx. 2.2 kilometers away); Thrombolites or Living Rocks (approx. 20.3 kilometers away).
 
More about this marker. This maker is located at the Point Amour Lighthouse at the Straits of Belle Isle overlook.
 
Also see . . .
1. Archaeocyatha. The remains of Archaeocyatha
The Point Amour Lighthouse image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2014
2. The Point Amour Lighthouse
The marker is located at the overlook on the left.
are mostly preserved as carbonate structures in a limestone matrix. This means that the fossils cannot be chemically or mechanically isolated, save for some specimens that have already eroded out of their matrices, and their morphology has to be determined from thin cuts of the stone in which they were preserved.
(Submitted on December 9, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Point Amour Lighthouse - Labrador Coastal Drive. At 109 feet from the ground to the light itself, Point Amour lighthouse is the tallest in Atlantic Canada and the second tallest lighthouse ever built in Canada. It is still a working lighthouse that is now automated of course. The lighthouse tower and surrounding buildings have been designated a Provincial Historic Site. .i (Submitted on December 9, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. CommunicationsWaterways & Vessels
 
The Diaphone foundation, view from the lighthouse image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2014
3. The Diaphone foundation, view from the lighthouse
Note the unusual pattern on the beach, its a patch reef.
Point Amour Lighthouse image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2014
4. Point Amour Lighthouse
The Point Amour Patch Reefs / Les plaques de recif de Point Amour image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2014
5. The Point Amour Patch Reefs / Les plaques de recif de Point Amour
The mound-like formations present along this shore are composed of the calcite skeletons of an extinct group of sponge-like animals called Archaeocyathids (arc-ae-o-sy-a thids). The Point Amour Arcaeocyathid reefs, which we formed 530 million years ago, provide evidence that this region was once in a warm shallow sea near the equator.
French:
Les formations arrondies le long de cette cote composent des squelettes calcifies d’un groupe d’animaux resemblant a l’éponge, aujourd’hui disparus nommes archaeocyatides. Les récifs archaeocyatides de Point Amour, qui se formèrent il y a environs 530 million d’années témoignent du fait que cette region était une fois un mer tièdes et peu profonde en proximité de l’équateur.
The Point Amour Patch Reefs / Les plaques de recif de Point Amour image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2014
6. The Point Amour Patch Reefs / Les plaques de recif de Point Amour
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 9, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 228 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 9, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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