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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Flower's Cove in Division No. 9 (North Peninsula), Newfoundland and Labrador — The Canadian Atlantic
 

Thrombolites or Living Rocks

 
 
Thrombolites or Living Rocks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2014
1. Thrombolites or Living Rocks Marker
Inscription. These are critically endangered microbial structures. Thrombolites-building micro-organisms resemble the earliest form of life on Earth. These organisms were the only known form of life from 3.5 billion to 650 million years ago. These are some of the earth’s most primitive life forms. Thrombolites (meaning clotted structure) are large bun shaped Cambrian mounds weathering out of flat lying dolostones. They were the growth form of millions of tiny algae and bacteria. These structures are not exactly fossils, but they are evidence for biological activity. These unicellular critters have left a good size trace of their existance (sic) in the fossil record. Thrombo, meaning clotted, indicates an internal structure without lamination. The darker colored, more rounded boulder is a glacial erratic brought here during the Pleistocene glaciation. The furrows, that contain mud-cracked material and radiate from the centre and down the sides, may be drainage channels. These organisms are thought to have thrived in the tidal and subtidal zone of a warm, very salty sea, some being exposed at low tide, and covered at high tide, thus explaining the mud cracks. The larger one may be several communities that amalgamated as they grew.
When you look across the bay to the south, you can see another large colony of Thrombolites on the shore. You can
Thrombolites or Living Rocks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2014
2. Thrombolites or Living Rocks Marker
The marker is near the right edge of the picture.
walk out to the small point where there is a fish hut built on a collection of mounds. Here the Thrombolites are not standing as high, but they are more numerous.
These structures are very, very rare. One other place in which they grow is Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia.
 
Location. 51° 17.584′ N, 56° 44.542′ W. Marker is near Flower's Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador, in Division No. 9 (North Peninsula). Marker can be reached from Newfoundland and Labrador Route 430, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Flower's Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador A0K 3N0, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 23 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Diaphone (approx. 20.3 kilometers away); The Marconi Station (approx. 20.4 kilometers away); L’Anse Amour Burial (approx. 22.5 kilometers away).
 
More about this marker. To reach the Thrombolites look for the signs along the highway near the south end of Flower's Cove. Take the unnamed road toward the water (left when heading north). From the parking lot, take the boardwalk, cross over the Marjorie footbridge and continue to the left along the beach.
 
Also see . . .
1. Flower Cove Thrombolites - Trail Peak
Thrombolites image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2014
3. Thrombolites
. Well signed from route 430, you can't miss it. Easy parking then across the road to the boardwalk leading to the Throlombites, which are best described as giant sea buns. (Submitted on December 11, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Linda Moore explains how the Thrombolites of Lake Clifton differ from Shark Bay Stromatolites - YouT. The late Dr Linda Moore (1956-2010) discusses her research on the thrombolites of Lake Clifton, Western Australia with Karina Kelly on the ABC program "Quantum" broadcast on 26th April 1989. She demonstrates how the Clifton Thrombolites differ from the Stromatolites of Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay. This is a 6 minute video clip. (Submitted on December 11, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Paleontology
 
Thrombolites image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2014
4. Thrombolites
Thrombolites image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2014
5. Thrombolites
Thrombolites image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2014
6. Thrombolites
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 11, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 382 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on December 14, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 11, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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