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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Forest Hills in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Machine in a Stone Box

 
 
Machine in a Stone Box Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
1. Machine in a Stone Box Marker
Inscription. Peirce Mill represents the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution in America. For centuries, small water-powered mills had ground grain into flour, using human labor in every step of the process. This 1829 mill, on the other hand, was a mechanized marvel., incorporating the latest labor-saving technologies pioneered by American inventor Oliver Evans. Water turned the wheel, which spun a shaft that drove gears, belts, a grain elevator, and a variety of machines. Assisted by gravity and a single miller, the mills machinery automatically turned grain into flour.
 
Location. 38° 56.424′ N, 77° 3.101′ W. Marker is in Forest Hills, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Tilden Street NW. Touch for map. At Peirce Mill in Rock Creek Park. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pierce Mill (a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing); Pierce Plantation (within shouting distance of this marker); Herring Highway (within shouting distance of this marker); The Peirce Family Estate (within shouting distance of this marker); Orchards, Fields, Gardens, Pastures
Machine in a Stone Box Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
2. Machine in a Stone Box Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Peirce Still House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rock Creek's Mills (about 300 feet away); Springhouse (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Forest Hills.
 
Also see . . .  "The Unofficial Oliver Evans' National Historic Site". Peirce Mill, Rock Creek Park, Washington, D. C. by T.R. Hazen. (Submitted on December 18, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Machine in a Stone Box Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
3. Machine in a Stone Box Marker
Breastshot Wheel image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
4. Breastshot Wheel
Close-up of photo on marker
Machine in a Stone Box image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
5. Machine in a Stone Box
Close-up of diagram on marker
Breastshot Wheel image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
6. Breastshot Wheel
As water drops over the wheel its momentum and weight provide power equivalent to 30 pulling drafthorses.
Close-up of diagram on marker
You are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
7. You are Here
A dam diverted water from Rock Creek into a headrace, which channeled the water to the mill's waterwheel. Water returned to Rock Creek via a tailrace.
Close-up of map on marker
Tailrace image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
8. Tailrace
Peirce Mill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
9. Peirce Mill
Peirce Mill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
10. Peirce Mill
Oliver Evans image. Click for full size.
By W. G. Jackman
11. Oliver Evans
Engraving by W.G. Jackman (Wikipedia) -- Modified by ACB.
Plate ⅩⅩⅼ image. Click for full size.
By Oliver Evans
12. Plate ⅩⅩⅼ
From The Young Millwright and Miller's Guide by Oliver Evans, 1795
Plaque in the South Gable<br>B<br>I • P<br>1829 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2014
13. Plaque in the South Gable
B
I • P
1829
B here may stand for ‘Betsy’ (Betsy and Isaac Peirce, 1824) or ‘Built’ (Built by Isaac Peirce, 1829).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 18, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 307 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on December 18, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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