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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Deersville in Harrison County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Moravian Trail

 
 
The Moravian Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 21, 2014
1. The Moravian Trail Marker
Inscription. This ridge road west from Cadiz through Deersville to the Tuscarawas Valley is known locally as the Moravian Trail. Originally an Indian path, it became an important trail for the frontiersmen. The men who participated in the Gnadenhutten Massacre, March 8, 1782, used this trail. In June, 1782, part of Crawford's defeated army fled eastward from pursuing Indians along this road. Both of these parties were led by Col. David Williamson, and the entire route from the Ohio to the Tuscarawas is know in history as Williamson's Trail.
 
Erected 1964 by Harrison County Historical Society. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Location. 40° 18.473′ N, 81° 11.225′ W. Marker is in Deersville, Ohio, in Harrison County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Mallarnee Road, on the right when traveling west on Main Street. Touch for map. Located at Deersville VFD. Marker is in this post office area: Deersville OH 44693, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Deersville (within shouting distance of this marker); Hazel's House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Moravian House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mary L. Jobe Akeley / Harry F. Hazlett
The Moravian Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 21, 2014
2. The Moravian Trail Marker
(approx. mile away); Laceyville (approx. 3.2 miles away); Tappan (approx. 3.4 miles away); The Seven Ranges (approx. 3.8 miles away); Moorefield, Ohio (approx. 7.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Deersville.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Additional comments.
1. Marker
This marker was originally 1.6 miles east of town. It was moved in the early 90's
    — Submitted December 1, 2016, by Adam Woodward of Cadiz, Ohio.

 
Categories. Native AmericansRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 28, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 21, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 441 times since then and 85 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 21, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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