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Near Fort Scott in Bourbon County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Gordon Parks Homecoming

1912 - 2006

 
 
Gordon Parks Homecoming Monument [Side A] image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 20, 2014
1. Gordon Parks Homecoming Monument [Side A]
Inscription.

Homecoming [Side A]
This small town into which I was born, has, for me, grown into the largest, and most important city in the universe. For Scott is not as tall, or heralded as New York, Paris or London - or other places my feet have roamed, but it is home.

Surely, I remember the harsh days, the sordid bigotry and segregated schools - and indeed the graveyard for Black people, (where my beloved mother and father still rest beneath Kansas earth).

But recently, the bitterness, that hung around for so many years seems to have asked for silence, for escape from the weariness of those ugly days past. Thankfully hatred is suddenly remaining quiet, [k]eeping its mouth shut! And I'm thankful [f]or the contentment we lost along the way. My hope now is that each of us can find [w]hat God put us here to find - Love! Let us have no more truck with the devil!

Gordon Parks
UN Plaza, New York, NY
October 2, 2001

A Sign By The Road [Side B]
It stands at the edge of a Prairie town telling anyone, who cares, that I was born there. Perhaps the space left will say "Now he's buried here." Today a will-maker dropped by to tell me that time was weary and growing shorter and shorter; that nights for laughter and dancing are almost over. Perhaps a year, or more is patiently waiting. Beyond

Gordon Parks Homecoming Monument [Side B] image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 20, 2014
2. Gordon Parks Homecoming Monument [Side B]
that winding road, Momma, Papa and sisters lay, assigned to graves that accommodate their Blackness. Night arrived loaded with buckets of tainted memories that had besieged my childhood with despair. No escape!

Troublesome reminders slammed me into a past where White doors frowned at me and White Schools shunned my presence. Fortunately some might fine things happened along the way for me, and that prairie town. Ups and downs have a way of contradicting the future. That sign, standing proudly on the road to Fort Scott, appears to be invisible to both malice and hatred. Crowned with mystery, racism seems to be wrinkling into solitude.

My doctor stretches my remaining years to 10! My bones hope he is right. But doctors, and will-makers can be wrong. I came into this world pronounced dead. Thankfully, God condemned that declaration. I survived. The end predicted for me, fell into a hole and died. So now I don't sit around waiting, day by day -- for death to call my name again.

Gordon Parks - March 2005


 
Erected 2007 by Westar Energy and Ken and Charlotte Lunt.
 
Location. 37° 47.813′ N, 94° 43.005′ W. Marker is near Fort Scott, Kansas, in Bourbon County. Touch for map. Monument is in Section 7 of Evergreen Cemetery. Marker
Gordon Parks Homecoming Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 20, 2014
3. Gordon Parks Homecoming Monument
is at or near this postal address: 914 215th Street, Fort Scott KS 66701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mercy Hospital Cross (approx. 0.8 miles away); David Lee Regan (approx. one mile away); Combat Infantrymen (approx. 2 miles away); Fort Scott National Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); Jeannette Huntington Ware (approx. 2.1 miles away); In Memory of The Soldiers (approx. 2.2 miles away); The Little White House (approx. 2.3 miles away); Normal Victory Bell (approx. 2.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Scott.
 
Also see . . .
1. Gordon Parks Biography. (Submitted on December 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. The Gordon Parks Museum at Fort Scott Community College. (Submitted on December 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Gordon Parks: Back to Fort Scott. (Submitted on December 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Gordon Parks at Kansapedia. (Submitted on December 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. African AmericansArts, Letters, MusicCemeteries & Burial SitesCivil Rights
 
Gordon Parks Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 20, 2014
4. Gordon Parks Grave Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 244 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 22, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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