Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pensacola in Escambia County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Commanding Officer's Compound

 
 
The Commanding Officer's Compound Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
1. The Commanding Officer's Compound Marker
Inscription. This excavated area includes a part of the space where the Commanding Officer's Compound was located. It included a building, outbuildings, a formal garden area, and an outdoor kitchen. In addition, it was the center of Fort business, especially during the Spanish period. In fact , it appears that Andrew Jackson came to the site in 1821, to sign the agreements that ceded all of Florida to the United States.
 
Erected by the City of Pensacola, the University of West Florida & the Historic Pensacola Preservation Board.
 
Location. 30° 24.522′ N, 87° 12.754′ W. Marker is in Pensacola, Florida, in Escambia County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East Zarragossa Street and East Jefferson Street. Touch for map. Located behind the T.T. Wentworth Florida State Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 330 East Jefferson Street, Pensacola FL 32502, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The End of the Colonial Era in Florida (a few steps from this marker); John Wesley Hardin (within shouting distance of this marker); The Life and Legacy of T. T. Wentworth, Jr. (within shouting distance of this marker); Gateway to Florida’s History
The Commanding Officer's Compound dig site. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
2. The Commanding Officer's Compound dig site.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Colonial Pensacola - Archaeology Brings History to Life (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Pensacola Opera House (about 400 feet away); Gen. Andrew Jackson (about 400 feet away); William Dudley Chipley (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pensacola.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Colonial Archaeological Trail. (Submitted on January 7, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesSettlements & Settlers
 
The Commanding Officer's Compound dig site. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
3. The Commanding Officer's Compound dig site.
Historic Pensacola Village Colonial Archaeological Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
4. Historic Pensacola Village Colonial Archaeological Trail Marker
The Commanding Officers' Building image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
5. The Commanding Officers' Building
The wide trench is part of a Spanish Commanding Officer's Building. The foundation walls supporting this structure were built in trenches. Artifacts associated with this period of residence were found in trench fill-dirt. The bricks from these foundations were removed sometime before the 1993 excavation. Bricks are a valuable recyclable building material and some of the buildings in the historic district may well have used some of these bricks.
Outdoor Kitchen image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
6. Outdoor Kitchen
These brick foundations are believed to be part of an outdoor kitchen serving the Spanish and British commanding officers. This kitchen was built during the early Spanish occupation of Pensacola and renovated by the British. Food preparation took place in a separate building to keep heat and fire hazard away from the residence.
Trash Pits Reveal the Past image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
7. Trash Pits Reveal the Past
Colonial residents disposed of their garbage by digging holes in the ground and burying the refuse. To the archaeologist the trash pit often serves as a time capsule. Materials in the pit help answer the who, when, what and how questions of an archaeological site. All the trash pits visible here contain refuse from the commanding officers' residence. It was here that an alligator skull and loggerhead turtle shell was recovered.
Recycling the Land image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
8. Recycling the Land
This small piece of real estate has been reused many times during Pensacola history. The colonists used the land to fortify and protect their territory until 1821, In 1887, a building containing Masonic Lodge #7 and a restaurant was constructed. The brick foundation visible around the perimeter of the excavation area is from this structure. Later uses included club rooms, police patrol, youth free clinic, city garage and fire station. In 1956, the building was torn down and a parking lot was constructed in its place. In 1994, this park in tribute to the colonial period in Pensacola was opened.
T.T. Wentworth Florida State Museum in front image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
9. T.T. Wentworth Florida State Museum in front
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 7, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 284 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on January 7, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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