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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Buffalo in Erie County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Buffalo's Olmsted Parks

A System of Parks & Parkways

 

—Architecture of the Coast —

 
Buffalo's Olmsted Parks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, January 17, 2015
1. Buffalo's Olmsted Parks Marker
Inscription.
Parks, Circles, and Parkways: These 'Greenspaces' were inspired by the 'City Beautiful' movement of the late 1800s, an attempt to correct the blighted condition of many industrial cities and make them more liveable through better design.

Circles: Circles served as hubs to collect traffic from major streets through adjacent neighborhoods.

Parks: Parks provided 'natural' features like pools, meadows, and woodlands.

Parkways: Parkways provided separate circulation pathways for different types of transportation.

Olmsted's Vision: Landscape Architect Frederick Law Olmsted envisioned Buffalo Parks as a system of parks and interconnecting park as a system of parkways extending through the heart of the city. Olmsted felt that access to green spaces for all city residents was essential for their physical and psychological well-being.

"...the best planned city, as to its streets, public places and grounds, in the United States if not in the world." - Frederick Law Olmsted describing Buffalo.

Park Approaches: Bridal Path in Lincoln Parkway c 1905. This unique feature of Olmsted's original park system consisted of magnificent corridors of green space connecting the parks to almost every neighborhood in the city, with circles at major intersections.

Major urban centers blossomed at key
Left Detail image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, January 17, 2015
2. Left Detail
Seaway Trail ports.


Seaway Trail, Inc., Corner Ray & West Main St., Sackets Harbor, NY 13685; 1-800-SEAWAY-T. This exhibit made possible by a grant from FHWA to Seaway Trail, Inc.
 
Erected by Seaway Trail, Inc.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Great Lakes Seaway Trail National Scenic Byway marker series.
 
Location. 42° 56.095′ N, 78° 52.343′ W. Marker is in Buffalo, New York, in Erie County. Marker is at the intersection of Nottingham Terrace and Lincoln Parkway, on the right when traveling east on Nottingham Terrace. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Buffalo NY 14216, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pan-American Exposition (within shouting distance of this marker); The Japanese Garden on Mirror Lake (approx. 0.2 miles away); To Commemorate the Gallantry of (approx. 0.2 miles away); Highlights of Buffalo History (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Pan-American Exposition (approx. 0.2 miles away); President McKinley (approx. ¼ mile away); Historic Scajaquada Creek (approx. 0.3 miles away); Albert James Myer, M.D. (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Buffalo.
 
Also see . . .
Right Detail image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, January 17, 2015
3. Right Detail

1. Frederick Law Olmsted - Wikipedia. (Submitted on January 18, 2015, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
2. Buffalo Olmsted Parks Conservancy. (Submitted on January 18, 2015, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkEnvironment
 
Eastward image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, January 17, 2015
4. Eastward
On path following Nottingham Terrace at left.
Westward image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, January 17, 2015
5. Westward
Ahead, the path crosses the Lincoln Parkway entrance to the westbound Scajaquada Expressway (NY 198).
Marker and Pedestrian Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, January 17, 2015
6. Marker and Pedestrian Bridge
Southward view. The bridge crosses the Scajaquada Expressway. The spiral approaches can be navigated on bikes. This is part of Delaware Park, the largest park in the city.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 18, 2015, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 232 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 18, 2015, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.
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