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Barney Circle in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Barney at Bladensburg

 

—Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail —

 
Barney at Bladensburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, January 25, 2015
1. Barney at Bladensburg Marker
Inscription. Barney Circle honors U.S. Navy Commodore Joshua Barney. In August 1814, Barney, his Chesapeake Flotillamen, and a contingent of U.S. Marines guarded a bridge over the Eastern Branch (Anacostia River) on today's Bladensburg Road, NE. When it became clear that the British were advancing on Bladensburg, Barney pleaded with the secretary of the Navy to join the fight. The commodore and his men hurried to the battlefield. They arrived just in time to put up the stiffest American resistance in the battle, but were overpowered. Barney was severely wounded. Impressed by Barney's courage, British officers treated his wounds and released him.

Photo captions:
Out of retirement Commodore Barney was retired from the Navy when war broke out. "To content himself with following the plough...while the blast of war was blowing in his ears, would have been...altogether contrary to his nature," wrote his daughter-in-law Mary.

Final stand at Bladensburg. Oil by Charles Waterhouse, U.S. Marine Corps Collection.

"They gave us the only fighting we have had."
British Rear Admiral George Cockburn

In the summer of 1814 the United States had been at war with Great Britain for two years. Battlefronts had erupted from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. On August 24, following their victory over the Americans at the Battle

Wide view of Barney at Bladensburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, January 25, 2015
2. Wide view of Barney at Bladensburg Marker
of Bladensburg, Maryland, British troops marched on Washington with devastating results.

The Star-Spangled Banner Historic Trail reveals sites of the War of 1812 in Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland. Visit ChesapeakeExplorerApp.com or download the Chesapeake Explorer App.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 52.877′ N, 76° 58.838′ W. Marker is in Barney Circle, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 17th Street NE and 17th and G Streets NE, on the right when traveling north on 17th Street NE. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. U.S. Arsenal Explosion Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); John Philip Sousa (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); "The Healing Poles" (about 400 feet away); General Peterson Goodwyn (about 500 feet away); Heroes of 1814 (about 700 feet away); Historic Congressional Cemetery

Joshua Barney image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 7, 2015
3. Joshua Barney
Rembrandt Peale's 1817 portrait of Commodore Barney
Close-up of image on marker
(about 700 feet away); Elbridge Gerry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Seafarers Yacht Club (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barney Circle.
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
Final Stand at Bladensburg image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 7, 2015
4. Final Stand at Bladensburg
Colonel Charles Waterhouse's painting of Barney's Marine Battalion manning 12 pound guns at Bladensburg.
Close-up of image on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 21, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 25, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 476 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 25, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   3, 4. submitted on February 8, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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