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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Washington in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Minefields

 
 
Minefields Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
1. Minefields Marker
Inscription. Minefields were an important part of the Endicott System of defense at the turn of the century. You are standing on the site that controlled the minefield operation.

Groups of underwater mines anchored in the river downstream from the fort could be fired electrically from here when enemy ships passed nearby. The guns of Batteries White (visible below to your right), Many, and Smith protected the minefield from enemy minesweepers and destroyers.
 
Location. 38° 42.658′ N, 77° 2.145′ W. Marker is in Fort Washington, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Fort Washington Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in Fort Washington Park, on the southwest demi-bastion. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13551 Fort Washington Road, Fort Washington MD 20744, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Shot and Shell (within shouting distance of this marker); Counterscarp Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); Water Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Cisterns (within shouting distance of this marker); New Guns for an Old Fort
Minefields Wayside image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
2. Minefields Wayside
The control building stood at the southernmost corner of the bastion, where the marker now stands.
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Caponiere (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named The Water Battery (about 400 feet away); The Northwest Demi-Bastion (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Washington.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays two photographs on the lower left below the text. The upper photograph details This building housed the plotting instrument and controls for the minefield, and shows a structure in the angle of the demi-bastion where the marker stands today.

The lower photograph is captioned: This building, located on the lower level, housed the generator that supplied the power for the minefield. To the right is a drawing of the mine field as it looked in place in the river.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Washington. National Park Service site. (Submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. U.S. Naval Mines. Page detailing the types of mines used by the United States, past and present. (Submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitary
 
Minefields Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 12, 2014
3. Minefields Marker
Minefield Location image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
4. Minefield Location
Looking downstream from the fort, defenders would have placed the mines in the channel to the south. The intent, aside from disabling or sinking enemy ships, was to cause confusion and force radical maneuvers which reduced the enemy's accuracy.
Control Building image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 12, 2014
5. Control Building
This building housed the plotting instrument and controls for the minefield.
Close-up of photo on marker
Generator Building image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 12, 2014
6. Generator Building
This building, located on the lower level,housed the generator that supplied the power for the minefield.
Close-up of photo on marker
Minefield image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 12, 2014
7. Minefield
Close-up of image on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 783 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on July 26, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on June 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on July 26, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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