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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Queenstown in Queen Anne's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

British Command

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

 

—War of 1812 —

 
British Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 31, 2015
1. British Command Marker
Inscription. The British invaded Kent Island on August 5, 1813. British Rear Admiral George Cockburn of the Royal Navy planned an attack on Queenstown by land and water, a pincer attack. Even though this plan was questioned by his fellow commander, British Army Officer Colonel Sir Thomas Sidney Beckwith, it was carried out and was ultimately unsuccessful.

Lieutenant Colonel Charles Napier, second in command to Beckwith, felt that the multi-officer command, which also included Admiral Sir John Warren, created “a republic of commanders” and was to blame for the earlier failed attack on Craney Island, Virginia.

The Royal Marines
Second Battalion formed in July, 1812 at Chatham, ordered to duty in Spain in August 1812, returned to England December of 1812. April 7, 1813 they leave for North America, arrive in June, 1813 and participate in the Craney Island, Norfolk attacks, in August of 1813 they invade Kent Island, and were “hutted in the woods” on Robert Gardner’s property at the Narrows.

(Inscription next to the photo in the upper left)
Rear Admiral George Cockburn-Reviled by residents of the Chesapeake region his plans of attack were often found ill-planned by fellow officers.

Sir Sidney Beckwith-Commander of the British land forces of the Chesapeake Campaign. His second-in-command, Napier, reported

Close up of the map on the British Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 31, 2015
2. Close up of the map on the British Command Marker
(Inscription under the map) British Encampment Locations: 1. Broad Creek 2.British Headquarters 3. “Hutted in the woods” on Robert Gardner’s property 4. Temporarily at Kent Pt. & Parson’s Pt.
that he “was not free to do what he thought wise…”

(Inscription next to the photo in the lower left)
Sir Charles Napier-Second-in-command to Beckwith, Napier was opposed to Cockburn’s plans for the Queenstown attack.
 
Erected by National Park Service-United States Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 57.931′ N, 76° 10.917′ W. Marker is in Queenstown, Maryland, in Queen Anne's County. Marker is on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Queenstown MD 21658, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Battle Enjoined! (here, next to this marker); Protecting the Homefront (here, next to this marker); Lure of Freedom (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Slippery Hill (approx. 0.4 miles away); Road to Battle (approx. half a mile away); Governor William Grason (approx. 1.1 miles away); “Lord’s Gift” (approx. 1.7 miles away); Colonial Courthouse (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Queenstown.
 
Categories. War of 1812

 
British Command Marker is one of the three markers in the photo image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 31, 2015
3. British Command Marker is one of the three markers in the photo
Distant photo of the British Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 31, 2015
4. Distant photo of the British Command Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 7, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 204 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 7, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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